(Image source: The New York Times)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum scored an easy win in the Louisiana primary Saturday, picking up 10 delegates. In a state where Santorum was heavily favored, he beat out Mitt Romney 49 to 27 percent and — in a victory speech — touted himself as the real deal for conservatives. Sky News has it.

 

“We went down and talked about being the strong and true conservative in this race … I’m not running as a conservative candidate for president. I am the conservative candidate for president.”

 

As CNN shows us, Santorum took almost every demographic in Louisiana. And the exit polling shows a huge income gap between supporters of Santorum and Romney.

 

“When you go down here to the under $30,000, look at that: Santorum — 64 percent … The only area in which Mitt Romney won was in people who made $200,000 or more.”

 

Despite the win, the delegate math remains tough for Santorum. Romney has already picked up almost half the necessary delegates — currently holding 568. With only 22 nominating contests left, Santorum holds 261. But, on MSNBC, John Heilemann notes Santorum can still hold out for a brokered convention.

 

“Rick Santorum knows he cannot win this nomination outright before Tampa. But he can stop Mitt Romney in some mathematical situations. If he hadn’t won tonight, he wouldn’t be allowed to keep trying.”

 

Newt Gingrich took 15 percent of the vote Saturday, while Ron Paul grabbed 6 percent. But in the eyes of pundits — the win especially hurt for Gingrich, who set out a plan relying on Southern states to propel him to the nomination. Politico reports that hasn’t worked out so well for the former House Speaker.

 

“For Gingrich, an inability to nab even a few delegates out of Louisiana would be the latest example of a campaign that continues to unravel. Gingrich announced in early February that he would implement a Southern strategy, attempting to sweep the deep South... But so far, he’s been able to win only his home state of Georgia and neighboring South Carolina.”

 

And The Washington Post writes, although the GOP race has been long and hard-fought, the format of the primary process in the next month could help Romney seal the deal.

 

“Starting in April, states can begin awarding their delegates on a winner-take-all basis, which provides for bigger swings in the delegate race and could help Romney expand his lead more quickly. In addition, the majority of contests in April take place in the Northeastern part of the country... Romney has won every state in that region so far.”

 

The next nominating contests come April 3 in Maryland, Wisconsin and Washington, D.C. Those will be followed by a three-week break in the primary process.

Santorum Picks Up 10 Delegates with Louisiana Win

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Mar 25, 2012

Santorum Picks Up 10 Delegates with Louisiana Win

(Image source: The New York Times)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Republican presidential hopeful Rick Santorum scored an easy win in the Louisiana primary Saturday, picking up 10 delegates. In a state where Santorum was heavily favored, he beat out Mitt Romney 49 to 27 percent and — in a victory speech — touted himself as the real deal for conservatives. Sky News has it.

 

“We went down and talked about being the strong and true conservative in this race … I’m not running as a conservative candidate for president. I am the conservative candidate for president.”

 

As CNN shows us, Santorum took almost every demographic in Louisiana. And the exit polling shows a huge income gap between supporters of Santorum and Romney.

 

“When you go down here to the under $30,000, look at that: Santorum — 64 percent … The only area in which Mitt Romney won was in people who made $200,000 or more.”

 

Despite the win, the delegate math remains tough for Santorum. Romney has already picked up almost half the necessary delegates — currently holding 568. With only 22 nominating contests left, Santorum holds 261. But, on MSNBC, John Heilemann notes Santorum can still hold out for a brokered convention.

 

“Rick Santorum knows he cannot win this nomination outright before Tampa. But he can stop Mitt Romney in some mathematical situations. If he hadn’t won tonight, he wouldn’t be allowed to keep trying.”

 

Newt Gingrich took 15 percent of the vote Saturday, while Ron Paul grabbed 6 percent. But in the eyes of pundits — the win especially hurt for Gingrich, who set out a plan relying on Southern states to propel him to the nomination. Politico reports that hasn’t worked out so well for the former House Speaker.

 

“For Gingrich, an inability to nab even a few delegates out of Louisiana would be the latest example of a campaign that continues to unravel. Gingrich announced in early February that he would implement a Southern strategy, attempting to sweep the deep South... But so far, he’s been able to win only his home state of Georgia and neighboring South Carolina.”

 

And The Washington Post writes, although the GOP race has been long and hard-fought, the format of the primary process in the next month could help Romney seal the deal.

 

“Starting in April, states can begin awarding their delegates on a winner-take-all basis, which provides for bigger swings in the delegate race and could help Romney expand his lead more quickly. In addition, the majority of contests in April take place in the Northeastern part of the country... Romney has won every state in that region so far.”

 

The next nominating contests come April 3 in Maryland, Wisconsin and Washington, D.C. Those will be followed by a three-week break in the primary process.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www1