(Image source: YouTube/RickSantorum)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

A new web ad from Rick Santorum depicts his campaign’s vision of America two years into President Barack Obama’s second term.

 

“The wait to see a doctor is ever-increasing, gas prices through the roof… Welcome to Obamaville.”

 

As The New York Times says, the ad is hardly “morning in America. It is more like apocalypse in America.

 

One aspect of the video in particular has caused controversy — 

 

— a split-second morphing between Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Mr. Obama. Here’s that section of the video at normal speed.

 

And again, as we slow it down. 

 

The ad has been compared to a George W. Bush campaign ad from 2000, in which the words “rats” morphs into “bureaucrats” in a description of Al Gore’s health care policy.

 

Although a Santorum strategist tells Politico the morph is meant to show a “constant threat back and forth” between the U.S. and Iran, NPR calls it an unsuccessful attempt to link Obama with Ahmadinejad in voters’ minds.

 

“Marketing experts say subliminal messages don't really work, whether it's to sell consumer products or political candidates. But that doesn't stop people from continuing to use the technique.”

 

On MSNBC, Alex Wagner gives her reaction and a Santorum spokesman defends the ad.

 

WAGNER: “I didn’t actually see Freddy Kruger in that video, but I think he may be in the full-length cut.”

HOGAN GIDLEY: “All that ad did was outline the fact that if this president gets re-elected, there’s going to be more of the same out there.”

 

The ad is meant for the web, meaning Santorum is not required to appear at the end of the video announcing his approval for the message. Politico’s Alex Burns writes there are more videos like this one to come:

 

“Santorum strategist John Brabender tells me the video kicks off an eight-part miniseries. The focus on small-town America is of a piece with Santorum's campaign message so far, which has focused on maxing out support for the Republican in conservative and more rural areas.”

 

On Fox News, Mike Huckabee points out the positive — for Republicans, at least.

 

“At least Santorum is not attacking one of the other Republicans, and he’s putting his focus on Barack Obama. The biggest problem I’ve seen with the Republican primary is that the candidates have savaged each other.”

 

One note about this ad — unlike other videos posted to Santorum’s YouTube channel, this one is unlisted — meaning you can only find it through a referral link, not through a search of YouTube or Google.   

Santorum Ad Paints Grim Image of 'Obamaville'

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Mar 26, 2012

Santorum Ad Paints Grim Image of 'Obamaville'

(Image source: YouTube/RickSantorum)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

A new web ad from Rick Santorum depicts his campaign’s vision of America two years into President Barack Obama’s second term.

 

“The wait to see a doctor is ever-increasing, gas prices through the roof… Welcome to Obamaville.”

 

As The New York Times says, the ad is hardly “morning in America. It is more like apocalypse in America.

 

One aspect of the video in particular has caused controversy — 

 

— a split-second morphing between Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and Mr. Obama. Here’s that section of the video at normal speed.

 

And again, as we slow it down. 

 

The ad has been compared to a George W. Bush campaign ad from 2000, in which the words “rats” morphs into “bureaucrats” in a description of Al Gore’s health care policy.

 

Although a Santorum strategist tells Politico the morph is meant to show a “constant threat back and forth” between the U.S. and Iran, NPR calls it an unsuccessful attempt to link Obama with Ahmadinejad in voters’ minds.

 

“Marketing experts say subliminal messages don't really work, whether it's to sell consumer products or political candidates. But that doesn't stop people from continuing to use the technique.”

 

On MSNBC, Alex Wagner gives her reaction and a Santorum spokesman defends the ad.

 

WAGNER: “I didn’t actually see Freddy Kruger in that video, but I think he may be in the full-length cut.”

HOGAN GIDLEY: “All that ad did was outline the fact that if this president gets re-elected, there’s going to be more of the same out there.”

 

The ad is meant for the web, meaning Santorum is not required to appear at the end of the video announcing his approval for the message. Politico’s Alex Burns writes there are more videos like this one to come:

 

“Santorum strategist John Brabender tells me the video kicks off an eight-part miniseries. The focus on small-town America is of a piece with Santorum's campaign message so far, which has focused on maxing out support for the Republican in conservative and more rural areas.”

 

On Fox News, Mike Huckabee points out the positive — for Republicans, at least.

 

“At least Santorum is not attacking one of the other Republicans, and he’s putting his focus on Barack Obama. The biggest problem I’ve seen with the Republican primary is that the candidates have savaged each other.”

 

One note about this ad — unlike other videos posted to Santorum’s YouTube channel, this one is unlisted — meaning you can only find it through a referral link, not through a search of YouTube or Google.   

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