(Image source: The Christian Science Monitor)

 

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR JAMAL ANDRESS

 

 

A Russian republic in Siberia is waging an all-out war ... on the region’s wolf population.

 

Officials in Yakutia have declared a state of emergency, and are calling for special task forces of hunters to drastically reduce the some 3,500 wolves in the region. This, following the increased attacks on livestock, like horses and reindeer in the region.

 

According to The Telegraph, some experts say this winter’s especially cold temperatures have thinned out the wolves’ traditional diet of rabbits, and this is to blame for their change in appetite.

 

And while major wolf threats like these are rare in Russia, they’re not unheard of. Just two years ago, a “superpack” of 400 wolves terrorized another Siberian village, leaving scientists baffled, as wolves typically travel in packs of 6 to 7.

 

Russia Today reports the hunting brigades would need to kill about 1,000 wolves per month to meet the government’s April deadline.  Six-figure prizes will be rewarded to the top hunters.

 

 

Russian Republic Launches 'War on Wolves'

by Elizabeth Hagedorn
0
Transcript
Jan 6, 2013

Russian Republic Launches 'War on Wolves'

 

(Image source: The Christian Science Monitor)

 

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR JAMAL ANDRESS

 

 

A Russian republic in Siberia is waging an all-out war ... on the region’s wolf population.

 

Officials in Yakutia have declared a state of emergency, and are calling for special task forces of hunters to drastically reduce the some 3,500 wolves in the region. This, following the increased attacks on livestock, like horses and reindeer in the region.

 

According to The Telegraph, some experts say this winter’s especially cold temperatures have thinned out the wolves’ traditional diet of rabbits, and this is to blame for their change in appetite.

 

And while major wolf threats like these are rare in Russia, they’re not unheard of. Just two years ago, a “superpack” of 400 wolves terrorized another Siberian village, leaving scientists baffled, as wolves typically travel in packs of 6 to 7.

 

Russia Today reports the hunting brigades would need to kill about 1,000 wolves per month to meet the government’s April deadline.  Six-figure prizes will be rewarded to the top hunters.

 

 

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