(Image Source: Flickr / @NYCPhotos)

BY JEREMY TRUITT

While there were mixed reactions around officials’ decision to go ahead with the NY City Marathon just two days ago, the reactions now that it’s been canceled are overwhelmingly supportive. Bloomberg News recaps the earlier sentiment.


“Those people have fought their way to get into their offices, as I said, slept on couches, had no gas in their car...they’re furious to hear that the Marathon is taking place on Sunday.”

Mayor Michael Bloomberg canceled the race after facing intense criticism in person, online and in the media, saying, “We would not want a cloud to hang over the race or its participants, and so we have decided to cancel it.” (Via The Washington Post)

Since then, the response has turned from vitriolic to encouraged. One New York resident who started a Facebook page calling for the marathon’s cancellation had this response.

“I’m so grateful to the runners, and the sponsors of the marathon that they made this decision. I’m truly grateful that they’ve listened.” (Video via HLN)

A Staten Island resident reacted with an emotional response about priorities.

“Thank God. My reaction is I’m glad they’re coming to their senses and realizing that these resources are going to be needed where they’re truly needed.” (Video via NBC News)

The runners themselves are less excited, but still understanding. The Guardian reports the common sentiment seems to be if the race was going to be cancelled, why wait so long to do it?

One runner lamented, “We understand, but maybe the decision could have been made earlier, before we traveled this far”

Many of the 47,000 runners already made the trip, but the New York Times reports, without a reason to stick around, the city could lose much of the $340 million the marathon brings in each year.

But a blogger for the Huffington Post has a possible solution: encourage the runners to stay in New York and volunteer.

“We should use this moment to demonstrate how New Yorkers and individuals from around the world can come together on short notice and assist those in need.”

Entrants into the 2012 marathon will have a guaranteed spot in the 2013 race or in the New York City half marathon.

Runners and Residents React to NYC Marathon Cancellation

by Steven Sparkman
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Transcript
Nov 3, 2012

Runners and Residents React to NYC Marathon Cancellation

 

(Image Source: Flickr / @NYCPhotos)

BY JEREMY TRUITT

While there were mixed reactions around officials’ decision to go ahead with the NY City Marathon just two days ago, the reactions now that it’s been canceled are overwhelmingly supportive. Bloomberg News recaps the earlier sentiment.


“Those people have fought their way to get into their offices, as I said, slept on couches, had no gas in their car...they’re furious to hear that the Marathon is taking place on Sunday.”

Mayor Michael Bloomberg canceled the race after facing intense criticism in person, online and in the media, saying, “We would not want a cloud to hang over the race or its participants, and so we have decided to cancel it.” (Via The Washington Post)

Since then, the response has turned from vitriolic to encouraged. One New York resident who started a Facebook page calling for the marathon’s cancellation had this response.

“I’m so grateful to the runners, and the sponsors of the marathon that they made this decision. I’m truly grateful that they’ve listened.” (Video via HLN)

A Staten Island resident reacted with an emotional response about priorities.

“Thank God. My reaction is I’m glad they’re coming to their senses and realizing that these resources are going to be needed where they’re truly needed.” (Video via NBC News)

The runners themselves are less excited, but still understanding. The Guardian reports the common sentiment seems to be if the race was going to be cancelled, why wait so long to do it?

One runner lamented, “We understand, but maybe the decision could have been made earlier, before we traveled this far”

Many of the 47,000 runners already made the trip, but the New York Times reports, without a reason to stick around, the city could lose much of the $340 million the marathon brings in each year.

But a blogger for the Huffington Post has a possible solution: encourage the runners to stay in New York and volunteer.

“We should use this moment to demonstrate how New Yorkers and individuals from around the world can come together on short notice and assist those in need.”

Entrants into the 2012 marathon will have a guaranteed spot in the 2013 race or in the New York City half marathon.

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