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“Jailbreaking allows smart phones users to run third party apps that really haven’t been approved by Apple or other manufacturers by unlocking the operating system on their phones. That’s not to say they’ll stay unlocked the software update for the company. And you’re back for square one...”  

This week, The U.S. Copyright Office's ruling made iPhone jailbreaking legal, but what does that really mean for iPhone users?

We’re analyzing coverage of this ruling from Fox News, CNN, ABC News, PC World and Sky News.

CNN reports that before, users who would jailbreak, would suffer hefty fines. But with this ruling, you can now switch carriers.

“...those who did it had risk of a $2,500 fine. But not anymore. And more good news for hackers. It’s now legal to jailbreak your phone to switch cell carriers. That means, in the case of iPhone users,  if you can figure out how to do it, you can use a non-AT&T provider, at least theoretically.”

According to PC World, an Apple spokesperson says that if users do use third party applications, it could lead to security holes, computer viruses and hardware damage.

"Apple's goal has always been to insure that our customers have a great experience with their iPhone and we know that jailbreaking can severely degrade the experience. ... the vast majority of customers do not jailbreak their iPhones as this can violate the warranty and can cause the iPhone to become unstable and not work reliably."

Sky News reports that Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), an Internet rights group that fought for the change starting 19 months ago, did so to protect users from binding situations.

The copyright law that until now made it illegal to jailbreak iPhones is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). It restricts the use of digital copyright works. But according to ABC News the U.S. copyright office looks at exemptions to the law every three years. Among the other exemptions...

“…allow the cracking of video game digital rights management controls to probe security flaws, [and] allows the breaking of DVD encryptions by professors, students and documentary makers so the clips can be used for education and commentary.” 
(ABC News)
 
So is this really a blow to Apple? And will more iPhone users jailbreak their phones to switch carriers?
 

Get more multi-source news from Newsy.com.
 

WRITER: Jenn Ballard
PRODUCER: Newsy Staff




Ruling Allows Users to Legally 'Jailbreak' iPhones

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Jul 27, 2010

Ruling Allows Users to Legally 'Jailbreak' iPhones

(Thumbnail Image: Tweaktown)


Get more multi-source U.S. news from Newsy.com.


“Jailbreaking allows smart phones users to run third party apps that really haven’t been approved by Apple or other manufacturers by unlocking the operating system on their phones. That’s not to say they’ll stay unlocked the software update for the company. And you’re back for square one...”  

This week, The U.S. Copyright Office's ruling made iPhone jailbreaking legal, but what does that really mean for iPhone users?

We’re analyzing coverage of this ruling from Fox News, CNN, ABC News, PC World and Sky News.

CNN reports that before, users who would jailbreak, would suffer hefty fines. But with this ruling, you can now switch carriers.

“...those who did it had risk of a $2,500 fine. But not anymore. And more good news for hackers. It’s now legal to jailbreak your phone to switch cell carriers. That means, in the case of iPhone users,  if you can figure out how to do it, you can use a non-AT&T provider, at least theoretically.”

According to PC World, an Apple spokesperson says that if users do use third party applications, it could lead to security holes, computer viruses and hardware damage.

"Apple's goal has always been to insure that our customers have a great experience with their iPhone and we know that jailbreaking can severely degrade the experience. ... the vast majority of customers do not jailbreak their iPhones as this can violate the warranty and can cause the iPhone to become unstable and not work reliably."

Sky News reports that Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), an Internet rights group that fought for the change starting 19 months ago, did so to protect users from binding situations.

The copyright law that until now made it illegal to jailbreak iPhones is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA). It restricts the use of digital copyright works. But according to ABC News the U.S. copyright office looks at exemptions to the law every three years. Among the other exemptions...

“…allow the cracking of video game digital rights management controls to probe security flaws, [and] allows the breaking of DVD encryptions by professors, students and documentary makers so the clips can be used for education and commentary.” 
(ABC News)
 
So is this really a blow to Apple? And will more iPhone users jailbreak their phones to switch carriers?
 

Get more multi-source news from Newsy.com.
 

WRITER: Jenn Ballard
PRODUCER: Newsy Staff




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