(Image source: C-SPAN)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR JEREMY TRUITT


In what may be the last “gotcha” moment of the presidential race, the Romney campaign pounced on a comment President Obama made Friday in Ohio.

Obama: “...a Senate candidate by the name of Mitt Romney...”
Audience: “Boo!”
Obama: “No, no, no. Don’t boo. Vote! Vote! Voting is the best revenge.” (Video via C-SPAN)

It was a play on the saying “Living well is the best revenge.” But Obama’s critics don’t think it was very witty.

A writer for Hot Air says:

“...when you’ve run such a doggedly negative campaign and people are craving that good ol’ Hopenchange spirit of days gone by, it just sounds snide and petty.”

On Saturday, Romney made the remark a central feature of his stump speeches.

Romney: “He asked his supporters to vote for revenge.”
Audience: “Boo!”
Romney: “I ask the American people to vote for love of country.” (Video via Fox News)

The back-and-forth was quickly made into a campaign ad. A writer for the Washington Times explains why.

“The remarks offered Mr. Romney another opening to hammer home his campaign theme that he has a proven track record of reaching across the political aisle  

And like so many campaign tactics, this one is being scrutinized by the other side, who say the president’s remarks are being taken out of context. The New Yorker writes:

“Revenge for what? The Romney ad doesn’t say; it doesn’t mention the line about Republicans that proceeded Obama’s comments. It is just somehow naturally opposed ... to a love of America. That is a strange judgment to make about what is, after all, a call for civic participation—to take differences to the polls.”

An Obama spokesperson defended the revenge remark, saying it came in the context of Romney using misleading ads to scare Ohio workers into thinking the Chrysler plant was being outsourced to China.

Talking Points Memo quotes a spokesperson, saying:

“The message he was sending is if you don’t like the policies, if you don’t like the plan that Gov. Romney is putting forward, if you think that’s a bad deal for the middle class, then you can go to the voting booth and cast your ballot … It’s nothing more complicated than that.”

Both campaigns reiterated the election is more than a choice between two candidates — it’s between two visions of the country.

Romney Camp Hammers Obama on 'Revenge' Remark

by Steven Sparkman
1
Transcript
Nov 3, 2012

Romney Camp Hammers Obama on 'Revenge' Remark

 

(Image source: C-SPAN)

BY STEVEN SPARKMAN
ANCHOR JEREMY TRUITT


In what may be the last “gotcha” moment of the presidential race, the Romney campaign pounced on a comment President Obama made Friday in Ohio.

Obama: “...a Senate candidate by the name of Mitt Romney...”
Audience: “Boo!”
Obama: “No, no, no. Don’t boo. Vote! Vote! Voting is the best revenge.” (Video via C-SPAN)

It was a play on the saying “Living well is the best revenge.” But Obama’s critics don’t think it was very witty.

A writer for Hot Air says:

“...when you’ve run such a doggedly negative campaign and people are craving that good ol’ Hopenchange spirit of days gone by, it just sounds snide and petty.”

On Saturday, Romney made the remark a central feature of his stump speeches.

Romney: “He asked his supporters to vote for revenge.”
Audience: “Boo!”
Romney: “I ask the American people to vote for love of country.” (Video via Fox News)

The back-and-forth was quickly made into a campaign ad. A writer for the Washington Times explains why.

“The remarks offered Mr. Romney another opening to hammer home his campaign theme that he has a proven track record of reaching across the political aisle  

And like so many campaign tactics, this one is being scrutinized by the other side, who say the president’s remarks are being taken out of context. The New Yorker writes:

“Revenge for what? The Romney ad doesn’t say; it doesn’t mention the line about Republicans that proceeded Obama’s comments. It is just somehow naturally opposed ... to a love of America. That is a strange judgment to make about what is, after all, a call for civic participation—to take differences to the polls.”

An Obama spokesperson defended the revenge remark, saying it came in the context of Romney using misleading ads to scare Ohio workers into thinking the Chrysler plant was being outsourced to China.

Talking Points Memo quotes a spokesperson, saying:

“The message he was sending is if you don’t like the policies, if you don’t like the plan that Gov. Romney is putting forward, if you think that’s a bad deal for the middle class, then you can go to the voting booth and cast your ballot … It’s nothing more complicated than that.”

Both campaigns reiterated the election is more than a choice between two candidates — it’s between two visions of the country.

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