(Image source: Lansing State Journal)

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Michigan lawmakers have approved a right-to-work bill, the subject of intense controversy in the state.

Basically, the bill would make union membership voluntary, and make it so nonunion employees aren’t required to pay unions for work negotiating contracts.

VIA HLN: “The labor unions don't like that. They are saying collectively that means lower wages. ... You have teachers representing teachers unions who are there, obviously United Auto Workers would be there since this is Michigan.”

Michigan’s Republican-dominated legislature made its passage a foregone conclusion — but that didn’t stop opponents from protesting — calling the bill “anti-worker” because it would force workers to accept lower wages. Reuters is calling its passage a “stunning blow to the power of organized labor.”

Once signed into law, Michigan would become the country’s 24th right-to-work state.

Monday, even President Obama waded into the controversy, labeling right-to-work efforts as anti-union politics.

PRES. OBAMA, VIA WJBK: “What we shouldn’t be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. ... These so called ‘right to work’ laws — they don’t have to do with economics. They have everything to do with politics.”

No denying that politics play a role — in that Republicans and Democrats largely fall into their respective camps on this one.

When hundreds of teachers were expected to protest Tuesday, a FoxNews.com piece headlined it, “Teachers ditch school kids.”

Michigan’s right-to-work efforts are significant nationally because it’s long been considered a union stronghold. The United Auto Workers, the country’s wealthiest labor union, was born in Michigan. 17.5% of the state’s workers are unionized, making it the state with the fifth highest percentage of unionized workers according to Reuters.

'Right to Work' Passes in Michigan Amid Protests

by Christina Hartman
0
Transcript
Dec 11, 2012

'Right to Work' Passes in Michigan Amid Protests

(Image source: Lansing State Journal)

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Michigan lawmakers have approved a right-to-work bill, the subject of intense controversy in the state.

Basically, the bill would make union membership voluntary, and make it so nonunion employees aren’t required to pay unions for work negotiating contracts.

VIA HLN: “The labor unions don't like that. They are saying collectively that means lower wages. ... You have teachers representing teachers unions who are there, obviously United Auto Workers would be there since this is Michigan.”

Michigan’s Republican-dominated legislature made its passage a foregone conclusion — but that didn’t stop opponents from protesting — calling the bill “anti-worker” because it would force workers to accept lower wages. Reuters is calling its passage a “stunning blow to the power of organized labor.”

Once signed into law, Michigan would become the country’s 24th right-to-work state.

Monday, even President Obama waded into the controversy, labeling right-to-work efforts as anti-union politics.

PRES. OBAMA, VIA WJBK: “What we shouldn’t be doing is trying to take away your rights to bargain for better wages and working conditions. ... These so called ‘right to work’ laws — they don’t have to do with economics. They have everything to do with politics.”

No denying that politics play a role — in that Republicans and Democrats largely fall into their respective camps on this one.

When hundreds of teachers were expected to protest Tuesday, a FoxNews.com piece headlined it, “Teachers ditch school kids.”

Michigan’s right-to-work efforts are significant nationally because it’s long been considered a union stronghold. The United Auto Workers, the country’s wealthiest labor union, was born in Michigan. 17.5% of the state’s workers are unionized, making it the state with the fifth highest percentage of unionized workers according to Reuters.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www1