Image Source: Nature


By Dan Kennedy and Jennessa Ewing

Anchor Christina Hartman


Solemnly swear that you’re up to no good? Then a new invisibility cloak created by two Duke University scientists might help.  

Harry: “My body’s gone!”
Ron: “I know what that is. It’s an invisibility cloak!”  (Via YouTube

While it might be a while before you can actually hide under an invisible cloak, such as in the world of Harry Potter, the breakthrough at Duke does bring us one step closer.

Duke colleagues Nathan Landy and David R. Smith pulled off the task by making a centimeter scale cylinder vanish.

The materials they used for the cloak? Fiberglass and copper.

It may seem like magic, but it’s really just science. How did the scientists do it? Extreme Tech says...

“...invisibility cloaks operate by bending electromagnetic waves around objects -- so that instead of seeing the object, you see what’s behind the object.”

But the invisibility cloak does have a few imperfections it’ll need to hide.

The examiner says the illusion only works from one-direction, making it a two dimensional cloak.

Duke Professor Prof Henry told BBC that the ultimate goal.

"...is going to be very far from what most people would think of as a cloak: something thin and flexible, which you can wrap around yourself and change its shape.  ”

Duke researchers say the next step is to create an omnidirectional, 3D microwave invisibility cloak.
 

Researchers Successfully Cloak Object for the First Time

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Nov 12, 2012

Researchers Successfully Cloak Object for the First Time

Image Source: Nature


By Dan Kennedy and Jennessa Ewing

Anchor Christina Hartman


Solemnly swear that you’re up to no good? Then a new invisibility cloak created by two Duke University scientists might help.  

Harry: “My body’s gone!”
Ron: “I know what that is. It’s an invisibility cloak!”  (Via YouTube

While it might be a while before you can actually hide under an invisible cloak, such as in the world of Harry Potter, the breakthrough at Duke does bring us one step closer.

Duke colleagues Nathan Landy and David R. Smith pulled off the task by making a centimeter scale cylinder vanish.

The materials they used for the cloak? Fiberglass and copper.

It may seem like magic, but it’s really just science. How did the scientists do it? Extreme Tech says...

“...invisibility cloaks operate by bending electromagnetic waves around objects -- so that instead of seeing the object, you see what’s behind the object.”

But the invisibility cloak does have a few imperfections it’ll need to hide.

The examiner says the illusion only works from one-direction, making it a two dimensional cloak.

Duke Professor Prof Henry told BBC that the ultimate goal.

"...is going to be very far from what most people would think of as a cloak: something thin and flexible, which you can wrap around yourself and change its shape.  ”

Duke researchers say the next step is to create an omnidirectional, 3D microwave invisibility cloak.
 

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