(Image Source Wikimedia Commons)

BY CHRISTINA HONAN
Anchor Lauren Gores


Researchers in Sweden say they have found a link between muscle strength in teenage boys and early death. WSHM has the details

“Scientists followed one million males ages 16 to 19 for 24 years. Patients were given three muscle strength tests. They found low muscular strength was associated with a higher risk for early death like suicide and cardiovascular disease.”

The study defined “early death” as happening before 55. Health Day breakdowns the study’s results:  

“During the follow-up, 2.3 percent (more than 26,000) of the men died. The most common cause of death was suicide (22 percent), while cancer accounted for nearly 15 percent of deaths and cardiovascular diseases caused just less than 8 percent of deaths”

So, does this mean people should run out and hit the weights? Not necessarily, as the BBC explains.

“The team behind the BMJ study believe muscle strength reflects general fitness, which would explain the link. Experts stress the findings do not mean muscle building makes you live longer.”

Bottom line: This study is more evidence staying healthy in general can equate to a longer life.

 

Researchers Link Low Muscle Strength in Teens to Early Death

by Nichole Cartmell
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Transcript
Nov 22, 2012

Researchers Link Low Muscle Strength in Teens to Early Death

(Image Source Wikimedia Commons)

BY CHRISTINA HONAN
Anchor Lauren Gores


Researchers in Sweden say they have found a link between muscle strength in teenage boys and early death. WSHM has the details

“Scientists followed one million males ages 16 to 19 for 24 years. Patients were given three muscle strength tests. They found low muscular strength was associated with a higher risk for early death like suicide and cardiovascular disease.”

The study defined “early death” as happening before 55. Health Day breakdowns the study’s results:  

“During the follow-up, 2.3 percent (more than 26,000) of the men died. The most common cause of death was suicide (22 percent), while cancer accounted for nearly 15 percent of deaths and cardiovascular diseases caused just less than 8 percent of deaths”

So, does this mean people should run out and hit the weights? Not necessarily, as the BBC explains.

“The team behind the BMJ study believe muscle strength reflects general fitness, which would explain the link. Experts stress the findings do not mean muscle building makes you live longer.”

Bottom line: This study is more evidence staying healthy in general can equate to a longer life.

 

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