(Image source: BehindTheHustle.com)

 

 

BY CARISSA LOETHEN

ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO

 

“Social jet lag” is bad for you.  Okay, so what is “social jet lag?" TIME defines it as...

 

“The discrepancy between your natural body clock and your social clock ... If you’re relying an alarm clock to wake up every morning during the week, but sleeping in on weekends, that’s a good sign there’s a mismatch.”

 

CBS explains why German researchers are now saying “social jet lag” can be hard on the body and can make you fat.

 

“Doctors say you get less sleep and then you're more likely to smoke, drink, overeat. How can you solve this problem? Spend more time outdoors in the daylight.”

 

This media interest in “social jet lag” is coming about because of a study by Dr. Till Ronneberg and others at the Institute for Medical Psychology in Munich, Germany.   In the journal Current Biology the study’s authors point out...

 

“Social jet lag quantifies the discrepancy that often arises between circadian and social clocks, which results in chronic sleep loss... Our results demonstrate that living “against the clock” may be a factor contributing to the epidemic of obesity.”

 

And in a video Ronneberg made about the study he explains how “social jet lag” is something that has evolved over time because we don’t go outside as much anymore.

 

“Body clocks are set by the sunlight and the darkness of the night. Nowadays, our body clocks run differently because we don’t see the sun anymore and we live inside.”

 

CNN notes that this study does correlate with previous studies.

 

“The findings echo previous research linking higher BMI to sleep deprivation and irregular sleep schedules. In particular, numerous studies have found an increased risk of obesity... among shift workers. Social jet lag may be harmful in the same way...”

 

CBC News reports that there is a possible solution.

 

“Researchers say it is possible to avoid social jet lag, but that would mean ignoring social convention and waking up when your own particular body says you should.”

 

Well that would be nice but Roenneberg offers a little more realistic advice on WebMD.

 

“People who would like to stay up a little later should try to get more sunlight in the afternoon and evening...”

 

For some folks, probably easier said than done.

Researchers Examine Effects of 'Social Jet Lag'

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
May 12, 2012

Researchers Examine Effects of 'Social Jet Lag'

 

(Image source: BehindTheHustle.com)

 

 

BY CARISSA LOETHEN

ANCHOR ANA COMPAIN-ROMERO

 

“Social jet lag” is bad for you.  Okay, so what is “social jet lag?" TIME defines it as...

 

“The discrepancy between your natural body clock and your social clock ... If you’re relying an alarm clock to wake up every morning during the week, but sleeping in on weekends, that’s a good sign there’s a mismatch.”

 

CBS explains why German researchers are now saying “social jet lag” can be hard on the body and can make you fat.

 

“Doctors say you get less sleep and then you're more likely to smoke, drink, overeat. How can you solve this problem? Spend more time outdoors in the daylight.”

 

This media interest in “social jet lag” is coming about because of a study by Dr. Till Ronneberg and others at the Institute for Medical Psychology in Munich, Germany.   In the journal Current Biology the study’s authors point out...

 

“Social jet lag quantifies the discrepancy that often arises between circadian and social clocks, which results in chronic sleep loss... Our results demonstrate that living “against the clock” may be a factor contributing to the epidemic of obesity.”

 

And in a video Ronneberg made about the study he explains how “social jet lag” is something that has evolved over time because we don’t go outside as much anymore.

 

“Body clocks are set by the sunlight and the darkness of the night. Nowadays, our body clocks run differently because we don’t see the sun anymore and we live inside.”

 

CNN notes that this study does correlate with previous studies.

 

“The findings echo previous research linking higher BMI to sleep deprivation and irregular sleep schedules. In particular, numerous studies have found an increased risk of obesity... among shift workers. Social jet lag may be harmful in the same way...”

 

CBC News reports that there is a possible solution.

 

“Researchers say it is possible to avoid social jet lag, but that would mean ignoring social convention and waking up when your own particular body says you should.”

 

Well that would be nice but Roenneberg offers a little more realistic advice on WebMD.

 

“People who would like to stay up a little later should try to get more sunlight in the afternoon and evening...”

 

For some folks, probably easier said than done.

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