(Image source: Twitter)

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Family and friends are grieving after Friday’s deadly shooting rampage at a Connecticut elementary school.

The shooting left 28 dead, including 20 children. But in the race to tell their stories, some journalists took to some questionable methods. (VIDEO VIA WTNH)

When someone tweeted about trying to get a hold of a friend with a daughter in kindergarten — ABC’s Nadine Shubailat tweeted back: “Can we talk to your friend... I’m w/ ABC News.”

To which the user responded, saying simply,
"Eat a dick."

That exchange was just after the news broke. And it turns out — Shubailat isn’t the only one to reach out to friends and family of victims through Twitter.

The New York Times’ Sam Dolnick tweeted at a woman who announced her cousin had died — offering condolences but also requesting an interview.

The Daily Caller calls the reporters “vultures.”

But Gawker was slightly more forgiving, writing: “We don't fault Shubailat for trying to cover her story. But randomly approaching people in high stress situations on Twitter may not be the best way to find interview subjects...”

Newtown residents grieved and remembered the victims at prayer memorials Friday night.

Reporters Tweet Shooting Victims' Families

by Christina Hartman
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Dec 15, 2012

Reporters Tweet Shooting Victims' Families

(Image source: Twitter)

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Family and friends are grieving after Friday’s deadly shooting rampage at a Connecticut elementary school.

The shooting left 28 dead, including 20 children. But in the race to tell their stories, some journalists took to some questionable methods. (VIDEO VIA WTNH)

When someone tweeted about trying to get a hold of a friend with a daughter in kindergarten — ABC’s Nadine Shubailat tweeted back: “Can we talk to your friend... I’m w/ ABC News.”

To which the user responded, saying simply,
"Eat a dick."

That exchange was just after the news broke. And it turns out — Shubailat isn’t the only one to reach out to friends and family of victims through Twitter.

The New York Times’ Sam Dolnick tweeted at a woman who announced her cousin had died — offering condolences but also requesting an interview.

The Daily Caller calls the reporters “vultures.”

But Gawker was slightly more forgiving, writing: “We don't fault Shubailat for trying to cover her story. But randomly approaching people in high stress situations on Twitter may not be the best way to find interview subjects...”

Newtown residents grieved and remembered the victims at prayer memorials Friday night.

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