(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

BY ORKIDE IZCI


ANCHOR JIM FLINK

 

Vitamins are a daily routine for many people.

But a new study says that multi-vitamins may actually increase the risk of death in some older women.  Chicago's WFLD has more,

“Researchers said that use of multivitamins was associated with a 2.4 percent increased risk of death for older women studied in Europe. The scientists found that women who were taking multi-vitamins were probably already getting enough of those nutrients from the foods they were eating. And getting too much of certain minerals, like iron, can be a health hazard.”

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland analyzed data from almost 39,000 women who participated in the Iowa Women’s Health Study, attempting to find a connection between dietary supplements and the risk of death. Third Age explains what they discovered. 

“They found that most supplements were associated with increased risk of death, including copper, vitamin B6, folic acid, iron, magnesium, zinc and multivitamins. The only supplement which reduced the risk of death was calcium … Iron was the supplement most strongly associated with a heightened risk of death.”

According to ABC News, about half of all Americans take vitamins everyday. While it might be a cause for concern - the network reports vitamin makers are saying no overblown conclusions should be drawn. 


“The leading trade association that represents the makers of dietary supplements was quick to fire back issuing a statement that the study was biased and did not prove that supplements caused any harm.It is important to keep in mind that this is an associative- not a cause and effect- study adding it may make for interesting scientific water cooler discussion, but certainly does not warrant sweeping, overstated concerns for elderly women.”

 

The BBC wasn’t analyzing the study - as much as it was the need for taking vitamins.  It interviewed Helen Bond from the British Diabetic Association who says - like many other things - dietary supplements should be taken in moderation.


“Some people, like the elderly, might need to take certain supplements. For example, vitamin D is recommended for people over the age of 65. Generally, people should be able to get all the vitamins and minerals they needed from a healthy, balanced diet. Some took supplements as an insurance policy, wrongly assuming that they could do no harm. But too much can be toxic and it is easy to inadvertently take more than the recommended daily amount."

Report: Taking Too Many Vitamins Could Be Deadly

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Oct 12, 2011

Report: Taking Too Many Vitamins Could Be Deadly

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

BY ORKIDE IZCI


ANCHOR JIM FLINK

 

Vitamins are a daily routine for many people.

But a new study says that multi-vitamins may actually increase the risk of death in some older women.  Chicago's WFLD has more,

“Researchers said that use of multivitamins was associated with a 2.4 percent increased risk of death for older women studied in Europe. The scientists found that women who were taking multi-vitamins were probably already getting enough of those nutrients from the foods they were eating. And getting too much of certain minerals, like iron, can be a health hazard.”

Researchers at the University of Eastern Finland analyzed data from almost 39,000 women who participated in the Iowa Women’s Health Study, attempting to find a connection between dietary supplements and the risk of death. Third Age explains what they discovered. 

“They found that most supplements were associated with increased risk of death, including copper, vitamin B6, folic acid, iron, magnesium, zinc and multivitamins. The only supplement which reduced the risk of death was calcium … Iron was the supplement most strongly associated with a heightened risk of death.”

According to ABC News, about half of all Americans take vitamins everyday. While it might be a cause for concern - the network reports vitamin makers are saying no overblown conclusions should be drawn. 


“The leading trade association that represents the makers of dietary supplements was quick to fire back issuing a statement that the study was biased and did not prove that supplements caused any harm.It is important to keep in mind that this is an associative- not a cause and effect- study adding it may make for interesting scientific water cooler discussion, but certainly does not warrant sweeping, overstated concerns for elderly women.”

 

The BBC wasn’t analyzing the study - as much as it was the need for taking vitamins.  It interviewed Helen Bond from the British Diabetic Association who says - like many other things - dietary supplements should be taken in moderation.


“Some people, like the elderly, might need to take certain supplements. For example, vitamin D is recommended for people over the age of 65. Generally, people should be able to get all the vitamins and minerals they needed from a healthy, balanced diet. Some took supplements as an insurance policy, wrongly assuming that they could do no harm. But too much can be toxic and it is easy to inadvertently take more than the recommended daily amount."

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