(Thumbnail image: bilerico.com)

 

“This year I will work with congress and our military to finally repeal the law that denies gay Americans the right to serve the country they love because of who they are…it’s the right thing to do.” (ABC News)

 

President Obama’s remarks in the State of the Union address has opponants and supporters of the controversial law buzzing. Obama pledged to reverse the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy during his presidential campaign, but some say he hasn’t some through. 

 

We’re looking at perspectives from Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC.

 

Gay rights activists across America have been outspoken over their disappointment in Obama’s lack of action on gay rights issues.

 

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow talks to an air force vet facing discharge from the military because of his sexual orientation. He discusses his frustrations with last night’s remarks.

 

“Overall, I could say I was just as disheartened and discouraged as I’ve been every other time we’ve heard these words.  I was also discouraged that it was just one sentence out thousands.  So, again we’ve heard these words in the past as you alluded to…what I really wanted to hear tonight was a plan of action.

 

In an interview with CNN, Servicemembers United founder Alexander Nicholson he says he is happy with how the president handled the issue.

“Tonight President Obama stepped up to the plate and made a firm commitment to work to finally end ‘don’t ask, don’t tell” in 2010…He didn’t pass the buck…he seemed to take the bull by the horns and fully commit’ said Nicholson. ‘I thought it was pretty clear that he intends to do it this year and take a leadership role.”

 

FOX News correspondent Mike Emanuel reports one controversial part of the debate.  Senator John McCain’s response to changing the policy.


“Arizona Senator John McCain who of course was a POW earlier in his career during the Vietnam era says that he thinks President Obama would be making a big mistake by changing “don’t ask, don’t tell”.  He thinks the policy that goes back to the Clinton administration has worked very well.”

 

Other reports focus on the challenges inside the military. CNN’s Ted Rowlands talked to U.S Military soldiers about their experience with the policy and the additional pressures it presents.


“It’s a near constant thing.  You’re almost always putting up some sort of a front.  That band of brothers that everyone talks about, I’m kinda that brother with a secret and ya it does wear on you.”

 

So what do you think…is the old policy of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ working or should all Americans have equal opportunity to openly serve in the U.S military?

 

Writer: Liz Reed

Producer: Nathan Giannini

Reactions to Obama’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Pledge

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Sources:CNNFox News
Transcript
Jan 29, 2010

Reactions to Obama’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Pledge

(Thumbnail image: bilerico.com)

 

“This year I will work with congress and our military to finally repeal the law that denies gay Americans the right to serve the country they love because of who they are…it’s the right thing to do.” (ABC News)

 

President Obama’s remarks in the State of the Union address has opponants and supporters of the controversial law buzzing. Obama pledged to reverse the “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy during his presidential campaign, but some say he hasn’t some through. 

 

We’re looking at perspectives from Fox News, CNN, and MSNBC.

 

Gay rights activists across America have been outspoken over their disappointment in Obama’s lack of action on gay rights issues.

 

MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow talks to an air force vet facing discharge from the military because of his sexual orientation. He discusses his frustrations with last night’s remarks.

 

“Overall, I could say I was just as disheartened and discouraged as I’ve been every other time we’ve heard these words.  I was also discouraged that it was just one sentence out thousands.  So, again we’ve heard these words in the past as you alluded to…what I really wanted to hear tonight was a plan of action.

 

In an interview with CNN, Servicemembers United founder Alexander Nicholson he says he is happy with how the president handled the issue.

“Tonight President Obama stepped up to the plate and made a firm commitment to work to finally end ‘don’t ask, don’t tell” in 2010…He didn’t pass the buck…he seemed to take the bull by the horns and fully commit’ said Nicholson. ‘I thought it was pretty clear that he intends to do it this year and take a leadership role.”

 

FOX News correspondent Mike Emanuel reports one controversial part of the debate.  Senator John McCain’s response to changing the policy.


“Arizona Senator John McCain who of course was a POW earlier in his career during the Vietnam era says that he thinks President Obama would be making a big mistake by changing “don’t ask, don’t tell”.  He thinks the policy that goes back to the Clinton administration has worked very well.”

 

Other reports focus on the challenges inside the military. CNN’s Ted Rowlands talked to U.S Military soldiers about their experience with the policy and the additional pressures it presents.


“It’s a near constant thing.  You’re almost always putting up some sort of a front.  That band of brothers that everyone talks about, I’m kinda that brother with a secret and ya it does wear on you.”

 

So what do you think…is the old policy of ‘don’t ask, don’t tell’ working or should all Americans have equal opportunity to openly serve in the U.S military?

 

Writer: Liz Reed

Producer: Nathan Giannini

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