(Image Source: Politic365)

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Could election day could bring an addition to the stars and stripes?

“Could Puerto Rico become the 51st state of America? Early results show a majority of the residents of that territory voting.” (Via WAGT)

“The two-part referendum asked voters if they wanted to change Puerto Rico’s 114-year-long relationship with the U.S. and become a U.S. state or gain independence for the territory of 4 million people.” (Via WTVJ)

“They had three alternatives to choose from. 65 percent favor becoming the 51st U.S. state, followed by 31 percent for sovereign free association, and only 4 percent for independence.” (Via WTOC)

Regardless of the outcome, any change in the number of U.S. states would require approval from the U.S. Congress. And other Puerto Rican election results might slam the brakes on a bid for statehood.

Residents of the U.S. territory “elected Alejandro Garcia Padilla of the pro-commonwealth Popular Democratic Party, or PPD, as their new governor”. Fox News Latino notes that Garcia Padilla’s victory essentially halts hopes of statehood for another four years, since the PPD advocates an enhanced commonwealth status.

CNN notes this isn’t the first time a similar referendum has been brought before voters. Voters shot down statehood in 1967, 1993 and 1998, but an economic downturn and shrinking population were the factors that contributed to support for the measure this time around.

Puerto Rico is currently a self-governing territory of the United States, so its foreign policy and defense and most importantly much of the money Puerto Ricans depend on are federal funds provided by the U.S. Lately a budget deficit has become commonplace on the island, as last year the country’s debt amounted to $68 billion and its unemployment rate is more than 13 percent. (Via Deutsche Welle)

Should Congress grant approval for Puerto Rico to become a state, its citizens would have the right to vote in all U.S. elections, but would also have to pay federal taxes - something they currently are excused from.

Puerto Rico Votes on Potential U.S. Statehood

by Scott Malone
0
Transcript
Nov 7, 2012

Puerto Rico Votes on Potential U.S. Statehood

(Image Source: Politic365)

BY SCOTT MALONE

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

Could election day could bring an addition to the stars and stripes?

“Could Puerto Rico become the 51st state of America? Early results show a majority of the residents of that territory voting.” (Via WAGT)

“The two-part referendum asked voters if they wanted to change Puerto Rico’s 114-year-long relationship with the U.S. and become a U.S. state or gain independence for the territory of 4 million people.” (Via WTVJ)

“They had three alternatives to choose from. 65 percent favor becoming the 51st U.S. state, followed by 31 percent for sovereign free association, and only 4 percent for independence.” (Via WTOC)

Regardless of the outcome, any change in the number of U.S. states would require approval from the U.S. Congress. And other Puerto Rican election results might slam the brakes on a bid for statehood.

Residents of the U.S. territory “elected Alejandro Garcia Padilla of the pro-commonwealth Popular Democratic Party, or PPD, as their new governor”. Fox News Latino notes that Garcia Padilla’s victory essentially halts hopes of statehood for another four years, since the PPD advocates an enhanced commonwealth status.

CNN notes this isn’t the first time a similar referendum has been brought before voters. Voters shot down statehood in 1967, 1993 and 1998, but an economic downturn and shrinking population were the factors that contributed to support for the measure this time around.

Puerto Rico is currently a self-governing territory of the United States, so its foreign policy and defense and most importantly much of the money Puerto Ricans depend on are federal funds provided by the U.S. Lately a budget deficit has become commonplace on the island, as last year the country’s debt amounted to $68 billion and its unemployment rate is more than 13 percent. (Via Deutsche Welle)

Should Congress grant approval for Puerto Rico to become a state, its citizens would have the right to vote in all U.S. elections, but would also have to pay federal taxes - something they currently are excused from.

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