(Image source: El Universal)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

Crowds greeted Pope Benedict XVI on his first trip to Mexico on Friday. The pope says he hopes to use the trip to revitalize the faith of Mexico’s 93 million Catholics. BBC reports.

 

“This is Pope Benedict’s first visit to Spanish-speaking Latin America, and it already looks set to be a trip heavy on symbolism and politics. Mexico is a country with a huge Roman Catholic population, and they turned out in force.”

 

Al Jazeera reports many gangs hung banners in Mexico City calling for a temporary drug war truce to honor the pope’s visit. Pope Benedict addressed that violence directly while speaking to press. The Guardian has it.

 

“We know about the great beauty of Mexico, but there is also the huge problem of drug trafficking and violence. This is a large responsibility for the Catholic church, especially in a country made up of 80 percent Catholics. We must do everything we can against the evil that is destroying our humanity and our youth.”

 

Mexican President Felipe Calderon greeted the pope with praise and kind words, saying the leader of the Catholic Church “offered hope for a nation ravaged by violence, drought and hunger.” But, as Al Jazeera reports, Pope Benedict’s mission to revitalize Mexican faith could be an uphill battle in Mexico City.

 

“The man they call Papa Benedicto Dieciseis faces historic challenges here with the growing conversions turning Catholics in to Pentecostals, changing views, like the legalization of abortion and gay marriage in Mexico City.”

 

A pope last visited Mexico in 1999, when John Paul II traveled to the nation for his fifth and final visit. CNN reports adoration for that pope still lingers in Mexico, writing:

 

“Benedict's trip will likely be overshadowed by his deceased predecessor, Pope John Paul II. Barely a week before Benedict's arrival, an exhibit to honor John Paul opened in Mexico City ... It includes 200 personal items used by John Paul throughout his life and papacy.”

 

Opponents of President Calderon accuse the conservative leader of using Pope Benedict’s visit as a political ploy. But TIME Magazine writes:

 

“If you were Mexico’s ruling party, and your presidential candidate was down by double digits in the polls three months before the election, you’d be looking for some divine help too.”

 

Pope Benedict will preside over Sunday Mass in Mexico before moving on to Cuba on Monday. That papal visit will mark the first to the isolated Caribbean nation since John Paul traveled to Havana in 1998.

Pope Decries 'Evil' of Drug Wars During Mexico Trip

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Mar 25, 2012

Pope Decries 'Evil' of Drug Wars During Mexico Trip

(Image source: El Universal)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

Crowds greeted Pope Benedict XVI on his first trip to Mexico on Friday. The pope says he hopes to use the trip to revitalize the faith of Mexico’s 93 million Catholics. BBC reports.

 

“This is Pope Benedict’s first visit to Spanish-speaking Latin America, and it already looks set to be a trip heavy on symbolism and politics. Mexico is a country with a huge Roman Catholic population, and they turned out in force.”

 

Al Jazeera reports many gangs hung banners in Mexico City calling for a temporary drug war truce to honor the pope’s visit. Pope Benedict addressed that violence directly while speaking to press. The Guardian has it.

 

“We know about the great beauty of Mexico, but there is also the huge problem of drug trafficking and violence. This is a large responsibility for the Catholic church, especially in a country made up of 80 percent Catholics. We must do everything we can against the evil that is destroying our humanity and our youth.”

 

Mexican President Felipe Calderon greeted the pope with praise and kind words, saying the leader of the Catholic Church “offered hope for a nation ravaged by violence, drought and hunger.” But, as Al Jazeera reports, Pope Benedict’s mission to revitalize Mexican faith could be an uphill battle in Mexico City.

 

“The man they call Papa Benedicto Dieciseis faces historic challenges here with the growing conversions turning Catholics in to Pentecostals, changing views, like the legalization of abortion and gay marriage in Mexico City.”

 

A pope last visited Mexico in 1999, when John Paul II traveled to the nation for his fifth and final visit. CNN reports adoration for that pope still lingers in Mexico, writing:

 

“Benedict's trip will likely be overshadowed by his deceased predecessor, Pope John Paul II. Barely a week before Benedict's arrival, an exhibit to honor John Paul opened in Mexico City ... It includes 200 personal items used by John Paul throughout his life and papacy.”

 

Opponents of President Calderon accuse the conservative leader of using Pope Benedict’s visit as a political ploy. But TIME Magazine writes:

 

“If you were Mexico’s ruling party, and your presidential candidate was down by double digits in the polls three months before the election, you’d be looking for some divine help too.”

 

Pope Benedict will preside over Sunday Mass in Mexico before moving on to Cuba on Monday. That papal visit will mark the first to the isolated Caribbean nation since John Paul traveled to Havana in 1998.

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