(Image source: FreePokerMoneyNoDepositBonus)

 

BY JOSH FRYDMAN

ANCHOR JIM FLINK

 

You're watching multisource sports news analysis from Newsy

 

Regarded as one of the world’s best poker players, Phil Ivey is pushing his chips all in…but not at the poker table.


Ivey is suing his sponsor, Full Tilt Poker, saying the site damaged his reputation by not paying back $150 million owed to U.S. players in the wake of the federal crackdown on online poker sites in April.

In a statement released on his website, Ivey said,

"My name and reputation have been dragged through the mud, through the inactivity and indecision of others and on behalf of all poker players I refuse to remain silent any longer.”

Full Tilt, also known as Tiltware, fired back at Ivey releasing a statement saying:

“Contrary to his sanctimonious public statements, Phil Ivey’s meritless lawsuit is about helping just one player – himself…..Tiltware doubts Mr. Ivey’s frivolous and self-serving lawsuit will ever get to court. But if it does, the company looks forward to presenting facts demonstrating that Mr. Ivey is putting his own narrow financial interests ahead of the players he professes to help.”

Full Tilt was one of three online sites shut down by the FBI in an April crackdown on online gambling. Two other poker sites, PokerStars and Absolute Poker, were shut down and 11 people were indicted on charges they tricked banks into illegally processing payments for gambling.

While PokerStars has announced it has repaid players, a message on the Full Tilt Poker site advises users that it's still working on returning their money.

Ivey said he is dedicating his efforts to, “finding a solution for those who have been wronged by the painfully slow process of repayment.”

But the question remains how players with money tied up in Full Tilt will benefit from Ivey suing the company.

On Ivey’s Facebook fan page, fans have both lauded and questioned the poker star’s decision.

James Ellison posted: “Your honorable stand on this issue speaks volumes about your personal character and boasts your reputations in the poker community far higher than any bracelet.”

But Jon McClain doesn’t know how Ivey’s decision will benefit all the players with money tied up online:

“You are just making them look less reputable than they already were, all while asking for money from them. … How does your recent move protect FTP customers NEEDING to cash out?”

A blogger for Chipmeup.com is hopeful Ivey’s stand will help stack the chips back in the players’ favor.

“Phil's statement is likely to have a massive impact on Full Tilt's future, and will hopefully trigger some player payouts in the very near future. It certainly will be disappointing not seeing Phil at this year's WSOP, as many people believed he could near the top of the all-time bracelet leaderboard if he picked up some more this year.”

The 58-event World Series of Poker began on Tuesday and runs through July. Ivey has won eight World Series of Poker bracelets and more than $5.6 million during his career, placing him sixth in WSOP rankings, according to the organization.
 

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Phil Ivey Boycotts WSOP, Sues Sponsor

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Jun 3, 2011

Phil Ivey Boycotts WSOP, Sues Sponsor

(Image source: FreePokerMoneyNoDepositBonus)

 

BY JOSH FRYDMAN

ANCHOR JIM FLINK

 

You're watching multisource sports news analysis from Newsy

 

Regarded as one of the world’s best poker players, Phil Ivey is pushing his chips all in…but not at the poker table.


Ivey is suing his sponsor, Full Tilt Poker, saying the site damaged his reputation by not paying back $150 million owed to U.S. players in the wake of the federal crackdown on online poker sites in April.

In a statement released on his website, Ivey said,

"My name and reputation have been dragged through the mud, through the inactivity and indecision of others and on behalf of all poker players I refuse to remain silent any longer.”

Full Tilt, also known as Tiltware, fired back at Ivey releasing a statement saying:

“Contrary to his sanctimonious public statements, Phil Ivey’s meritless lawsuit is about helping just one player – himself…..Tiltware doubts Mr. Ivey’s frivolous and self-serving lawsuit will ever get to court. But if it does, the company looks forward to presenting facts demonstrating that Mr. Ivey is putting his own narrow financial interests ahead of the players he professes to help.”

Full Tilt was one of three online sites shut down by the FBI in an April crackdown on online gambling. Two other poker sites, PokerStars and Absolute Poker, were shut down and 11 people were indicted on charges they tricked banks into illegally processing payments for gambling.

While PokerStars has announced it has repaid players, a message on the Full Tilt Poker site advises users that it's still working on returning their money.

Ivey said he is dedicating his efforts to, “finding a solution for those who have been wronged by the painfully slow process of repayment.”

But the question remains how players with money tied up in Full Tilt will benefit from Ivey suing the company.

On Ivey’s Facebook fan page, fans have both lauded and questioned the poker star’s decision.

James Ellison posted: “Your honorable stand on this issue speaks volumes about your personal character and boasts your reputations in the poker community far higher than any bracelet.”

But Jon McClain doesn’t know how Ivey’s decision will benefit all the players with money tied up online:

“You are just making them look less reputable than they already were, all while asking for money from them. … How does your recent move protect FTP customers NEEDING to cash out?”

A blogger for Chipmeup.com is hopeful Ivey’s stand will help stack the chips back in the players’ favor.

“Phil's statement is likely to have a massive impact on Full Tilt's future, and will hopefully trigger some player payouts in the very near future. It certainly will be disappointing not seeing Phil at this year's WSOP, as many people believed he could near the top of the all-time bracelet leaderboard if he picked up some more this year.”

The 58-event World Series of Poker began on Tuesday and runs through July. Ivey has won eight World Series of Poker bracelets and more than $5.6 million during his career, placing him sixth in WSOP rankings, according to the organization.
 

Follow @Newsy_Videos on Twitter

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

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