(Image source: Facebook / Armed Forces Tea Party)

 

 

BY DANNY MATTESON

 

 

Photos allegedly showing U.S. troops speaking out against a potential war in Syria via hand-written signs have now been deemed “illegitimate” by the Pentagon. 

 

Speaking to ABC, U.S. Marine Corps spokesman Lt. Col. Neil Murphy said “We believe the photos are illegitimate” adding the photos are likely part of a “disinformation campaign that was part of a targeted ‘cyber redirect’ last week.”

 

The photos in question appear to show members of several branches of the U.S. military holding signs over their faces with messages like “I will not fight for Al Qaeda in Syria.” (Via Facebook)

 

Although the images have now made the rounds on social media they are believed to have originated as part of an online attack by the Syrian Electronic Army, a group that supports Syrian President Bashar Al Assad, earlier this month. 

 

That attack redirected users from the U.S. Marine Corps Website to a page displaying the images and a letter addressed to U.S. Marines. It referred to the Marines as “brothers” and urged them to refuse their orders. (Via Marines.com)

 

The Syrian Electronic Army has now taken credit for the attack, although it claims the pictures were gathered from quote “American Facebook pages.” (Via Twitter / @Official_SEA16)

 

Despite the dubious nature of the photos though, they have gained some traction amongst media and politicians. Several media outlets reported the photos as legitimate while Texas GOP Senator Ted Cruz appeared to reference one of the photos in an interview on ABC’s “This Week.” (Via Business Insider, New York Daily News)

 

“... that actual line, initially was said by Dennis Kucinich, and where I saw it after that was (FLASH) a Naval sailor who tweeted and said ‘I didn’t sign up to serve as Al Qaeda’s Air Force.’” (Via ABC)

 

The Syrian Electronic Army has been behind a rash of recent hacks and redirect attacks, including attacks on the BBC, CBS, the Associated Press’ Twitter account, The Onion, and The New York Times amongst others. (Via Bloomberg)

 

In recent weeks the group was added to an FBI advisory list of wanted cybercriminals. (Via ZDNet)

 

Pentagon Calls Soldiers' Syria Protest Photos 'Illegitimate'

by Danny Matteson
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Transcript
Sep 10, 2013

Pentagon Calls Soldiers' Syria Protest Photos 'Illegitimate'

(Image source: Facebook / Armed Forces Tea Party)

 

 

BY DANNY MATTESON

 

 

Photos allegedly showing U.S. troops speaking out against a potential war in Syria via hand-written signs have now been deemed “illegitimate” by the Pentagon. 

 

Speaking to ABC, U.S. Marine Corps spokesman Lt. Col. Neil Murphy said “We believe the photos are illegitimate” adding the photos are likely part of a “disinformation campaign that was part of a targeted ‘cyber redirect’ last week.”

 

The photos in question appear to show members of several branches of the U.S. military holding signs over their faces with messages like “I will not fight for Al Qaeda in Syria.” (Via Facebook)

 

Although the images have now made the rounds on social media they are believed to have originated as part of an online attack by the Syrian Electronic Army, a group that supports Syrian President Bashar Al Assad, earlier this month. 

 

That attack redirected users from the U.S. Marine Corps Website to a page displaying the images and a letter addressed to U.S. Marines. It referred to the Marines as “brothers” and urged them to refuse their orders. (Via Marines.com)

 

The Syrian Electronic Army has now taken credit for the attack, although it claims the pictures were gathered from quote “American Facebook pages.” (Via Twitter / @Official_SEA16)

 

Despite the dubious nature of the photos though, they have gained some traction amongst media and politicians. Several media outlets reported the photos as legitimate while Texas GOP Senator Ted Cruz appeared to reference one of the photos in an interview on ABC’s “This Week.” (Via Business Insider, New York Daily News)

 

“... that actual line, initially was said by Dennis Kucinich, and where I saw it after that was (FLASH) a Naval sailor who tweeted and said ‘I didn’t sign up to serve as Al Qaeda’s Air Force.’” (Via ABC)

 

The Syrian Electronic Army has been behind a rash of recent hacks and redirect attacks, including attacks on the BBC, CBS, the Associated Press’ Twitter account, The Onion, and The New York Times amongst others. (Via Bloomberg)

 

In recent weeks the group was added to an FBI advisory list of wanted cybercriminals. (Via ZDNet)

 

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