(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

The CIA isn’t the only American player in worldwide spy games. As the Pentagon turns its focus from a decade of war in the Middle East, it’s creating its own network of agents dedicated to covert intelligence gathering.

 

The Defense Intelligence Agency plans to send as many as 1,600 agents around the globe in the next five years — almost twice as many as its current count in the field. 

 

Their focus: monitoring weapons development in North Korea and Iran and the rapidly-moving Chinese military build-up — along with a slew of militant Islamic groups in Africa. U.S. Defense officials say those networks — al-Shabaab in Somalia, al-Qaeda in Nigeria and Boko Haram — should be a big focus in preventing attacks on U.S. soil.

 

And head of U.S. Africa Command, Ham Carter, says there’s widespread cooperation between them.

 

“Each of these organizations is, by itself, a dangerous and worrisome threat … They are likely sharing funds, training and explosive materials, which can be quite dangerous.”

 

The Washington Post reported the Pentagon’s plans for its spy program late Saturday, writing:

 

“The expansion of the [Defense] agency’s clandestine role is likely to heighten concerns that it will [escalate] operations outside public view … the military isn’t subject to the same congressional notification requirements as the CIA, leading to potential oversight gaps.”

 

As the U.K.’s Daily Mail notes, the reshaping of the Defense Intelligence Agency fits into the Obama administration’s increased emphasis on covert, precision-based operations over conventional warfare — the drone strikes and midnight raids that have been successful both in eliminating al-Qaeda’s top ranks and raising the ire of government watchdogs who decry a lack of accountability.

 

Although the Pentagon can act without oversight from lawmakers, it lacks the leeway given to the CIA for political sabotage or arming militant groups. The Defense Intelligence Agency’s new agents will work with Joint Special Operations Command but will receive assignments from the Defense Department.

Pentagon Building Spy Network Rivaling CIA in Size

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Dec 2, 2012

Pentagon Building Spy Network Rivaling CIA in Size

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

The CIA isn’t the only American player in worldwide spy games. As the Pentagon turns its focus from a decade of war in the Middle East, it’s creating its own network of agents dedicated to covert intelligence gathering.

 

The Defense Intelligence Agency plans to send as many as 1,600 agents around the globe in the next five years — almost twice as many as its current count in the field. 

 

Their focus: monitoring weapons development in North Korea and Iran and the rapidly-moving Chinese military build-up — along with a slew of militant Islamic groups in Africa. U.S. Defense officials say those networks — al-Shabaab in Somalia, al-Qaeda in Nigeria and Boko Haram — should be a big focus in preventing attacks on U.S. soil.

 

And head of U.S. Africa Command, Ham Carter, says there’s widespread cooperation between them.

 

“Each of these organizations is, by itself, a dangerous and worrisome threat … They are likely sharing funds, training and explosive materials, which can be quite dangerous.”

 

The Washington Post reported the Pentagon’s plans for its spy program late Saturday, writing:

 

“The expansion of the [Defense] agency’s clandestine role is likely to heighten concerns that it will [escalate] operations outside public view … the military isn’t subject to the same congressional notification requirements as the CIA, leading to potential oversight gaps.”

 

As the U.K.’s Daily Mail notes, the reshaping of the Defense Intelligence Agency fits into the Obama administration’s increased emphasis on covert, precision-based operations over conventional warfare — the drone strikes and midnight raids that have been successful both in eliminating al-Qaeda’s top ranks and raising the ire of government watchdogs who decry a lack of accountability.

 

Although the Pentagon can act without oversight from lawmakers, it lacks the leeway given to the CIA for political sabotage or arming militant groups. The Defense Intelligence Agency’s new agents will work with Joint Special Operations Command but will receive assignments from the Defense Department.

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