(Image source: Flickr)  

BY EMILY SPAIN

You're watching multisource U.S. news analysis from Newsy. 

 

Ugg boot fashionistas are in an uproar at a Pennsylvania middle school after administrators banned the fleecy footwear. Starting Monday -- students have to leave their beloved sheep skin boots behind.

NBC explains why Uggs got the boot.

“At Pottstown Middle School the distraction of cell phones and food hidden in Ugg style and open-top boots was so bad the district opted to ban them from class.”

There’s already a rule in place requiring students to keep cell phones and electronics in their lockers. The new ban allows students to wear boots to school, but they must change out of them when they arrive.

Students took to social media to voice their opinion on the boot ban.  One student complained on Facebook that the new rule isn’t going to fix the problem.
A blogger for Babble has that quote:

“Hmmm. I know most girls hide them in [their] bra, or their waist band. It’s ineffective they will just keep finding other places. Plus my phone fits in my sneaker.”

But school administrators and some parents think the boot rule is justified because it will eliminate distractions in the classroom.

PARENT 1: “Kids can’t learn if their cell phones keep going off during the day.”
PARENT 2: “They wear school uniforms. They should just go as far as having shoes, dress shoes.”


The ban has other parents saying “Ugh” about the idea of having to update their children’s shoe selection.  Some wonder why all 600 students must ditch their Uggs because of a handful of cell-phone smugglers.
A writer from the Examiner responds to that argument.

“That's a question asked of many rules, but it's true: even if the wrong doers are in the minority, if what they are doing causes an issue, a rule or law must be put in place that applies to all.”

And finally, a blogger for Bangstyle chimes in on the Ugg booting-- arguing-- students have the right to make a fashion statement and the school should get with the times...

“If Uggs were banned at my university, sorority girls would riot...Instead of creating stricter rules, schools should adjust to the changing times. Accepting that cell phones are an imperative part of the lives of teenagers and giving some leeway in the usage of these technologies might be a smart move. Until then, things are getting Ugg-ly.”

Open top boots are included in the ban, but tight boots or ones that lace up are exempt. First time boot offenders will get detention.

Transcript by Newsy.

 

PA Middle School Bans Ugg Boots

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Transcript
Jan 30, 2012

PA Middle School Bans Ugg Boots

(Image source: Flickr)  

BY EMILY SPAIN

You're watching multisource U.S. news analysis from Newsy. 

 

Ugg boot fashionistas are in an uproar at a Pennsylvania middle school after administrators banned the fleecy footwear. Starting Monday -- students have to leave their beloved sheep skin boots behind.

NBC explains why Uggs got the boot.

“At Pottstown Middle School the distraction of cell phones and food hidden in Ugg style and open-top boots was so bad the district opted to ban them from class.”

There’s already a rule in place requiring students to keep cell phones and electronics in their lockers. The new ban allows students to wear boots to school, but they must change out of them when they arrive.

Students took to social media to voice their opinion on the boot ban.  One student complained on Facebook that the new rule isn’t going to fix the problem.
A blogger for Babble has that quote:

“Hmmm. I know most girls hide them in [their] bra, or their waist band. It’s ineffective they will just keep finding other places. Plus my phone fits in my sneaker.”

But school administrators and some parents think the boot rule is justified because it will eliminate distractions in the classroom.

PARENT 1: “Kids can’t learn if their cell phones keep going off during the day.”
PARENT 2: “They wear school uniforms. They should just go as far as having shoes, dress shoes.”


The ban has other parents saying “Ugh” about the idea of having to update their children’s shoe selection.  Some wonder why all 600 students must ditch their Uggs because of a handful of cell-phone smugglers.
A writer from the Examiner responds to that argument.

“That's a question asked of many rules, but it's true: even if the wrong doers are in the minority, if what they are doing causes an issue, a rule or law must be put in place that applies to all.”

And finally, a blogger for Bangstyle chimes in on the Ugg booting-- arguing-- students have the right to make a fashion statement and the school should get with the times...

“If Uggs were banned at my university, sorority girls would riot...Instead of creating stricter rules, schools should adjust to the changing times. Accepting that cell phones are an imperative part of the lives of teenagers and giving some leeway in the usage of these technologies might be a smart move. Until then, things are getting Ugg-ly.”

Open top boots are included in the ban, but tight boots or ones that lace up are exempt. First time boot offenders will get detention.

Transcript by Newsy.

 

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