(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


Penn State saw its share of drama last year following the Jerry Sandusky case. And now the state plans to take action. Here’s WCAU with the details.

“Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett plans to announce details of a lawsuit filed against the NCAA. It regards sanctions leveled against Penn State University in light of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal.”

The sanctions agreed upon by Penn State and the NCAA include,

The heart of the lawsuit could stem from frustration over the $60 million fine. WPMT explains Corbett believes the NCAA overstepped its authority by levying these fines. And local politicians agree — the lawsuit will accompany new legislation asking for the fine money to stay in Pennsylvania.

“These are dollars... would go to benefit Pennsylvania's if it wasn't taken away in this manner. We think those dollars, if we are going to put it towards these type of programs it should be programs here in Pennsylvania.

A writer for the Bleacher Report explains these are sanctions that no politician would dismiss, but there are parts that of the deal that could be contested, especially a fine of this size. But he questions whether or not the state should even get involved.

“Obviously, this is a huge chunk of change that would be leaving the state … However … I can't help but think that the State of Pennsylvania would be better served by continuing to distance itself from this terrible story rather than bringing it back to the forefront once again.”

A sports law professor for Villanova explains this would certainly serve as a precedent-setting case by testing the limits of power of the NCAA.

“Now we have a third-party lawsuit by someone who is not a player in terms of what happens." The NCAA has "largely not been challenged, and here we have a challenge that, if successful, will be looked at as a road map for perhaps other states, or other third parties."

According to Sports Illustrated, the NCAA declined comment. And Penn State says it has no involvement in the suit, stressing it has worked in accordance with the NCAA following the Sandusky case.

Pa. Governor To Sue NCAA Over Sandusky Sanctions

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Jan 2, 2013

Pa. Governor To Sue NCAA Over Sandusky Sanctions

(Image source: Wikimedia Commons)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL
ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


Penn State saw its share of drama last year following the Jerry Sandusky case. And now the state plans to take action. Here’s WCAU with the details.

“Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett plans to announce details of a lawsuit filed against the NCAA. It regards sanctions leveled against Penn State University in light of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal.”

The sanctions agreed upon by Penn State and the NCAA include,

  • significant scholarship reductions for the school
  • four years of bowl ineligibility
  • vacated wins under coach Joe Paterno
  • and a $60 million fine, which would be put in an endowment for programs preventing child sex abuse or assisting abuse victims.

The heart of the lawsuit could stem from frustration over the $60 million fine. WPMT explains Corbett believes the NCAA overstepped its authority by levying these fines. And local politicians agree — the lawsuit will accompany new legislation asking for the fine money to stay in Pennsylvania.

“These are dollars... would go to benefit Pennsylvania's if it wasn't taken away in this manner. We think those dollars, if we are going to put it towards these type of programs it should be programs here in Pennsylvania.

A writer for the Bleacher Report explains these are sanctions that no politician would dismiss, but there are parts that of the deal that could be contested, especially a fine of this size. But he questions whether or not the state should even get involved.

“Obviously, this is a huge chunk of change that would be leaving the state … However … I can't help but think that the State of Pennsylvania would be better served by continuing to distance itself from this terrible story rather than bringing it back to the forefront once again.”

A sports law professor for Villanova explains this would certainly serve as a precedent-setting case by testing the limits of power of the NCAA.

“Now we have a third-party lawsuit by someone who is not a player in terms of what happens." The NCAA has "largely not been challenged, and here we have a challenge that, if successful, will be looked at as a road map for perhaps other states, or other third parties."

According to Sports Illustrated, the NCAA declined comment. And Penn State says it has no involvement in the suit, stressing it has worked in accordance with the NCAA following the Sandusky case.

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