(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY VICTORIA CRAIG

“Explosive.
”Controversial.”
“Motor mouth.”

 

Those are words used to describe Miami Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen and his remarks about Fidel Castro. Fox News explains the fury behind the comments – which resulted in a five game suspension for the manager.

“This is not something you will hear very often at all...Guillen told Time Magazine that he loves Castro and he respects the Cuban leader for staying in power as long as he has.”  

The long-time former Chicago White Sox Manager, Guillen is new to the Miami Marlins...he’s only five games into his tenure with the team. A town that doesn’t take a shine to Castro.

 

In a press conference Tuesday, Guillen apologized for his comments. But anchors for Chicago’s WFLD explain Guillen isn’t new to controversy. One anchor believes Guillen’s apology isn’t a true apology. Rather...

“Anchor 1: “..it’s not to say what I said wasn’t true. It’s to say I’m sorry because I know that I hurt people.”
Anchor 2: “No, you know, it’s interesting because he’s, Ozzie Guillen, he has a reputation of saying things that are controversial – saying what’s on his mind. I mean, this is not a new thing.”  


Not a new thing indeed. Back in 2008, he made similar comments to “Men’s Journal” magazine in 2008. Still, bloggers for the Washington Post write, there are negative implications that will stem from Guillen’s comments. And one of those comes down to economics.

“Guillen’s remarks came at a particularly sensitive time for the Marlins, who are trying to establish a solid base in Miami. The team just moved into a new $634-million ballpark that was funded mostly by taxpayers in Little Havana and, under owner Jeffrey Loria, was trying to re-establish itself.”

The Miami Hearald expands on that and says though economics is a big deal, that’s not the only problem facing the team at this point.


“Spanish-language radio stations popular with older Cuban Americans — a coveted local voting bloc — were inundated with calls from listeners offended by Guillen’s reported remarks.”

A New York Times blogger says even with Gullen’s apology, the controversy isn’t likely to go away anytime soon.

“Even if the Marlins succeed in staving off boycotts (not likely) and getting back to the business of reviving the actual baseball team (more likely), the reality has to set in that the Marlins have signed themselves up for unending headaches...There are too many microphones available at too many hours of the day for this to go well,...This went bad faster than even the most pessimistic would have imagined.”

Guillen’s press conference was held at the team’s new park and the apology was broadcast on video screens in the plaza outside the stadium.

Ozzie Guillen Apologizes For Controversial Castro Comments

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Transcript
Apr 10, 2012

Ozzie Guillen Apologizes For Controversial Castro Comments

(Image Source: Wikimedia Commons

BY VICTORIA CRAIG

“Explosive.
”Controversial.”
“Motor mouth.”

 

Those are words used to describe Miami Marlins manager Ozzie Guillen and his remarks about Fidel Castro. Fox News explains the fury behind the comments – which resulted in a five game suspension for the manager.

“This is not something you will hear very often at all...Guillen told Time Magazine that he loves Castro and he respects the Cuban leader for staying in power as long as he has.”  

The long-time former Chicago White Sox Manager, Guillen is new to the Miami Marlins...he’s only five games into his tenure with the team. A town that doesn’t take a shine to Castro.

 

In a press conference Tuesday, Guillen apologized for his comments. But anchors for Chicago’s WFLD explain Guillen isn’t new to controversy. One anchor believes Guillen’s apology isn’t a true apology. Rather...

“Anchor 1: “..it’s not to say what I said wasn’t true. It’s to say I’m sorry because I know that I hurt people.”
Anchor 2: “No, you know, it’s interesting because he’s, Ozzie Guillen, he has a reputation of saying things that are controversial – saying what’s on his mind. I mean, this is not a new thing.”  


Not a new thing indeed. Back in 2008, he made similar comments to “Men’s Journal” magazine in 2008. Still, bloggers for the Washington Post write, there are negative implications that will stem from Guillen’s comments. And one of those comes down to economics.

“Guillen’s remarks came at a particularly sensitive time for the Marlins, who are trying to establish a solid base in Miami. The team just moved into a new $634-million ballpark that was funded mostly by taxpayers in Little Havana and, under owner Jeffrey Loria, was trying to re-establish itself.”

The Miami Hearald expands on that and says though economics is a big deal, that’s not the only problem facing the team at this point.


“Spanish-language radio stations popular with older Cuban Americans — a coveted local voting bloc — were inundated with calls from listeners offended by Guillen’s reported remarks.”

A New York Times blogger says even with Gullen’s apology, the controversy isn’t likely to go away anytime soon.

“Even if the Marlins succeed in staving off boycotts (not likely) and getting back to the business of reviving the actual baseball team (more likely), the reality has to set in that the Marlins have signed themselves up for unending headaches...There are too many microphones available at too many hours of the day for this to go well,...This went bad faster than even the most pessimistic would have imagined.”

Guillen’s press conference was held at the team’s new park and the apology was broadcast on video screens in the plaza outside the stadium.

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