(Image Source : Miami Herald)

 

BY MADISON MACK


You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy



“It’s as if time has stood still. Bodies and possessions still to be recovered and most of the rubble hasn’t even been moved. But these are not pictures of Haiti a year ago, this is Haiti 12 months after the earthquake.”

Haitians are getting ready to mark the anniversary of the earthquake that devastated their country and left almost 250,000 of their fellow citizens dead. But so far, recovery has been painfully slow.

“A year ago people said there was a real chance to rebuild a new modern Haiti. There’s no sign of that is there?”
“As I’m looking at it right now, Haiti will never be rebuilt because I don’t see any signs. For something to be rebuilt you have to see signs, you have to see hands put in, you have to see actions, you have to see talks.”
“And your seeing none of that?”
“I’m not seeing any of it.”


Currently, more than 800,000 Haitians are still living in temporary shelters and the country is coping with an ongoing Cholera outbreak that has infected more than 170,000 Haitians already. After the earthquake, the international community pledged almost 9 billion dollars in aid to Haiti, yet only 10 percent of that has been dispersed. CBS News explains why.


Whitaker: “Relief workers say they are being cautious to make sure the money goes to where it can do the most good.”
Clinton: “To be fair to them, they have a right. They have people to represent, they have a right to know that there’s a model that’s likely to work.”

A writer for The Globe and Mail says
rebuilding Haiti will take another 10-15 years of hard work -- but progress is being made.

“...this was never a one-year project … People are moving from emergency tents to more permanent and semi-permanent shelters. Many of the camps are shrinking as people are able to reclaim their lives and rebuild their homes. Malnutrition is declining, as are maternal deaths. And tens of thousands of children are back in school.”

But on RT’s Crosstalk, a member of the Haiti Democracy Project says the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission is excluding Haitians from the reconstruction process.

“What we need is to support Haitian institutions, the private sector of Haiti, civil society and the Haitian government and it’s not happening right now. Haitians are completely put aside from the reconstruction process. We need at Haitian reconstruction committee and be part of the process. As you know when you talk about international aid, you cannot replace the client and the international community is trying to replace Haitians. We are very grateful for their the money they have given to us, but we don’t have any control right now.”

The UN has estimated it
will take a decade before Haiti can return to the state it was before the earthquake and even then, it was the poorest nation in the hemisphere.

 

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

One Year Later, Progress in Haiti 'Painfully Slow'

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Transcript
Jan 13, 2011

One Year Later, Progress in Haiti 'Painfully Slow'

(Image Source : Miami Herald)

 

BY MADISON MACK


You're watching multisource world news analysis from Newsy



“It’s as if time has stood still. Bodies and possessions still to be recovered and most of the rubble hasn’t even been moved. But these are not pictures of Haiti a year ago, this is Haiti 12 months after the earthquake.”

Haitians are getting ready to mark the anniversary of the earthquake that devastated their country and left almost 250,000 of their fellow citizens dead. But so far, recovery has been painfully slow.

“A year ago people said there was a real chance to rebuild a new modern Haiti. There’s no sign of that is there?”
“As I’m looking at it right now, Haiti will never be rebuilt because I don’t see any signs. For something to be rebuilt you have to see signs, you have to see hands put in, you have to see actions, you have to see talks.”
“And your seeing none of that?”
“I’m not seeing any of it.”


Currently, more than 800,000 Haitians are still living in temporary shelters and the country is coping with an ongoing Cholera outbreak that has infected more than 170,000 Haitians already. After the earthquake, the international community pledged almost 9 billion dollars in aid to Haiti, yet only 10 percent of that has been dispersed. CBS News explains why.


Whitaker: “Relief workers say they are being cautious to make sure the money goes to where it can do the most good.”
Clinton: “To be fair to them, they have a right. They have people to represent, they have a right to know that there’s a model that’s likely to work.”

A writer for The Globe and Mail says
rebuilding Haiti will take another 10-15 years of hard work -- but progress is being made.

“...this was never a one-year project … People are moving from emergency tents to more permanent and semi-permanent shelters. Many of the camps are shrinking as people are able to reclaim their lives and rebuild their homes. Malnutrition is declining, as are maternal deaths. And tens of thousands of children are back in school.”

But on RT’s Crosstalk, a member of the Haiti Democracy Project says the Interim Haiti Recovery Commission is excluding Haitians from the reconstruction process.

“What we need is to support Haitian institutions, the private sector of Haiti, civil society and the Haitian government and it’s not happening right now. Haitians are completely put aside from the reconstruction process. We need at Haitian reconstruction committee and be part of the process. As you know when you talk about international aid, you cannot replace the client and the international community is trying to replace Haitians. We are very grateful for their the money they have given to us, but we don’t have any control right now.”

The UN has estimated it
will take a decade before Haiti can return to the state it was before the earthquake and even then, it was the poorest nation in the hemisphere.

 

Get more multisource video news analysis from Newsy

Transcript by Newsy

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