(Image source: Flickr / Tony Alter)

 

 

BY MATT PICHT

 

 

The American obesity epidemic could be deadlier than previously thought — up to four times as deadly. That, according to a Columbia University study.

 

The study examined mortality patterns in American adults over a 20-year period. It found obesity was responsible for around 20 percent of adult fatalities — over four times the previous estimate. (Via American Journal of Public Health)

 

Obesity was recently classified as an illness by the American Medical Association. An Everyday Health writer says the study is another grim indicator of America’s weight problem.

 

“The obesity rate in the United States has been steadily rising since 1990. … In 1990, no state had an obesity rate over 19 percent, but by 2010, no state had an obesity rate below 20 percent.”

 

The sharp increase in mortality rate has some experts questioning the study’s methodology. An economist told the Los Angeles Times“If the number of weight-related deaths because of obesity had grown by a couple of percentage points, that would have seemed reasonable. But a more-than-threefold increase? ‘Not likely.’”

 

But NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman says the dramatic increase reflects a changing understanding about the risks of obesity.

 

“Obesity is related to heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, you name it. And we don’t on death certificates ever list obesity as a cause of death. So therefore, I think these numbers are real.”


The study was published Friday in the American Journal of Public Health.

Obesity Four Times Deadlier Than Experts Expected

by Matt Picht
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Transcript
Aug 16, 2013

Obesity Four Times Deadlier Than Experts Expected

(Image source: Flickr / Tony Alter)

 

 

BY MATT PICHT

 

 

The American obesity epidemic could be deadlier than previously thought — up to four times as deadly. That, according to a Columbia University study.

 

The study examined mortality patterns in American adults over a 20-year period. It found obesity was responsible for around 20 percent of adult fatalities — over four times the previous estimate. (Via American Journal of Public Health)

 

Obesity was recently classified as an illness by the American Medical Association. An Everyday Health writer says the study is another grim indicator of America’s weight problem.

 

“The obesity rate in the United States has been steadily rising since 1990. … In 1990, no state had an obesity rate over 19 percent, but by 2010, no state had an obesity rate below 20 percent.”

 

The sharp increase in mortality rate has some experts questioning the study’s methodology. An economist told the Los Angeles Times“If the number of weight-related deaths because of obesity had grown by a couple of percentage points, that would have seemed reasonable. But a more-than-threefold increase? ‘Not likely.’”

 

But NBC’s Dr. Nancy Snyderman says the dramatic increase reflects a changing understanding about the risks of obesity.

 

“Obesity is related to heart disease, stroke, some cancers, diabetes, you name it. And we don’t on death certificates ever list obesity as a cause of death. So therefore, I think these numbers are real.”


The study was published Friday in the American Journal of Public Health.

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