(Image source: Bloomberg / Andrew Harrer)

 

 

BY MATT PICHT

 

 

As lawmakers debate delaying parts of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, commonly known as “Obamacare,” for another year, a new report from New York could give the controversial act some support.


The New York Times reports health insurance costs for individuals in the state are set to fall by more than 50 percent as regulators begin implementing changes made by the ACA.


Previously, New Yorkers buying their own health insurance could expect to pay over $1,000 a month in premiums. But new rates for individuals approved by Gov. Andrew Cuomo range from $300 to $600 for standard coverage. (Via Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo)


On Capitol Hill, the article has already become a talking point for those defending the health care act. New York Rep. Joe Crowley brought up his state’s recent success Wednesday during a House debate over whether to delay more key provisions of the ACA.


“Instead of applauding this critical relief for families, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle plan to attack the parts of the law that made that possible in the first place.” (Via C-SPAN)


As a writer for Mother Jones points out, New York had a lot to gain from the health care reform — it has been one of the most expensive states to individually purchase health care since 1993.


“New York typifies the kind of healthcare mess that the law was designed to fix. As it stands now, only 17,000 New Yorkers buy their own insurance, compared to a whopping 2.6 million who have remained uninsured in the face of the state’s towering premiums.”


A writer for The Washington Post says New York is a perfect argument for the ACA, both in its recent success and its history of failure.


“New York has, for 20 years now, been a long-running experiment in what happens to universal coverage without an individual mandate. It’s the type of law the country would have if House Republicans succeeded in delaying the individual mandate. ... The result: a small insurance market with very high insurance premiums.”


But conservatives are questioning the math behind The Times’ article. The National Review points to a 2010 survey that put New York’s average individual premium as $357 — a far cry from the over-$1,000 statistic cited in The Times.


And not everyone is directly benefiting from the health care changes. Small employers will not be experiencing a similar cut in costs — their premiums will still hover around the same rate with marginal increases, according to Businessweek.

 

The House voted Wednesday to delay the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act, which requires individuals to purchase insurance by one year. The House also approved a similar delay to the employer mandate that required businesses to provide their employees with insurance.

NYT: Obamacare Cuts New York Health Insurance Costs by 50%

by Matt Picht
0
Transcript
Jul 17, 2013

NYT: Obamacare Cuts New York Health Insurance Costs by 50%

(Image source: Bloomberg / Andrew Harrer)

 

 

BY MATT PICHT

 

 

As lawmakers debate delaying parts of President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, commonly known as “Obamacare,” for another year, a new report from New York could give the controversial act some support.


The New York Times reports health insurance costs for individuals in the state are set to fall by more than 50 percent as regulators begin implementing changes made by the ACA.


Previously, New Yorkers buying their own health insurance could expect to pay over $1,000 a month in premiums. But new rates for individuals approved by Gov. Andrew Cuomo range from $300 to $600 for standard coverage. (Via Office of Governor Andrew Cuomo)


On Capitol Hill, the article has already become a talking point for those defending the health care act. New York Rep. Joe Crowley brought up his state’s recent success Wednesday during a House debate over whether to delay more key provisions of the ACA.


“Instead of applauding this critical relief for families, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle plan to attack the parts of the law that made that possible in the first place.” (Via C-SPAN)


As a writer for Mother Jones points out, New York had a lot to gain from the health care reform — it has been one of the most expensive states to individually purchase health care since 1993.


“New York typifies the kind of healthcare mess that the law was designed to fix. As it stands now, only 17,000 New Yorkers buy their own insurance, compared to a whopping 2.6 million who have remained uninsured in the face of the state’s towering premiums.”


A writer for The Washington Post says New York is a perfect argument for the ACA, both in its recent success and its history of failure.


“New York has, for 20 years now, been a long-running experiment in what happens to universal coverage without an individual mandate. It’s the type of law the country would have if House Republicans succeeded in delaying the individual mandate. ... The result: a small insurance market with very high insurance premiums.”


But conservatives are questioning the math behind The Times’ article. The National Review points to a 2010 survey that put New York’s average individual premium as $357 — a far cry from the over-$1,000 statistic cited in The Times.


And not everyone is directly benefiting from the health care changes. Small employers will not be experiencing a similar cut in costs — their premiums will still hover around the same rate with marginal increases, according to Businessweek.

 

The House voted Wednesday to delay the individual mandate of the Affordable Care Act, which requires individuals to purchase insurance by one year. The House also approved a similar delay to the employer mandate that required businesses to provide their employees with insurance.

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