(Image source: Al Jazeera)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

President Barack Obama is headed to what many call the most dangerous place on Earth. On the heels of new aggression from North Korea, he is set to visit the demilitarized zone that splits the peninsula. CNN reports the stop Sunday will be part of the president’s trip to the South Korean capital.

 

“The president will be in Seoul for a nuclear security summit involving 54 countries, including China and Russia. His predecessor, President George W. Bush used binoculars to look into North Korea from a sandbag bunker. That was back in 2002.”

 

The Los Angeles Times writes the nuclear security summit is a product of Mr. Obama’s speech in Prague in 2009 — when the president set a goal of securing all “vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years.”

 

“He convened the first summit in Washington in April 2010. That effort was welcomed by many nuclear policy experts who have warned for years that nuclear security was an overlooked and increasingly dangerous vulnerability. Al Qaeda has declared its interest in obtaining nuclear material.”

 

In a conference call with press, Mr Obama’s deputy national security adviser said the DMZ visit is meant to emphasize the bond between the U.S. and South Korea and show support for the U.S. troops stationed there. Al Jazeera reports the trip takes on special significance after an announcement from North Korea last week.

 

“North Korea plans to use a rocket to launch a satellite into orbit. Japan, the U.S. and other countries suspect it’s seeking to test long-range missiles in violation of international grievance.”

 

In light of North Korea’s announcement and President Obama’s visit, South Korean leadership wants to amend a contract with the U.S. limiting their own weaponry. The Christian Science Monitor writes:

 

“In the first substantive response to the North Korean plan, South Korea’s President Lee Myung-bak has indicated he will impress upon President Obama the South’s desire to update a 32-year-old agreement with the US that limits South Korean missiles to a range of 300 kilometers.”

 

And the BBC writes even North Korea’s closest diplomatic partner, China, is a little nervous about North Korea’s plans. In a statement released over the weekend, Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister Zhang Zhijun said:

 

“‘We sincerely hope parties concerned stay calm and exercise restraint and avoid escalation of tension that may lead to a more complicated situation’ ... On Saturday, [North Korea] said it had told the relevant international bodies about the launch, and would invite foreign experts and journalists to watch.”

 

Russia called North Korea’s plans a “serious concern.” But it’s Japan that’s chosen to take action. Bloomberg reports North Korea’s neighbors to the east are taking a close look at interceptor missiles.

 

“Tokyo says it hasn’t ruled out shooting the rocket down if it violates Japanese air space. The defense minister says Japan is considering how best to respond to this rocket.”

 

This all comes just a few weeks after Kim Jong Un agreed to suspend North Korea's missile program in return for U.S. food aid. The BBC reports North Korea plans to launch the satellite just in time for the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kim Il Sung — the nation’s founder and grandfather of the current leader.

Obama Visiting DMZ in Wake of North Korean Aggression

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Mar 22, 2012

Obama Visiting DMZ in Wake of North Korean Aggression

(Image source: Al Jazeera)

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

President Barack Obama is headed to what many call the most dangerous place on Earth. On the heels of new aggression from North Korea, he is set to visit the demilitarized zone that splits the peninsula. CNN reports the stop Sunday will be part of the president’s trip to the South Korean capital.

 

“The president will be in Seoul for a nuclear security summit involving 54 countries, including China and Russia. His predecessor, President George W. Bush used binoculars to look into North Korea from a sandbag bunker. That was back in 2002.”

 

The Los Angeles Times writes the nuclear security summit is a product of Mr. Obama’s speech in Prague in 2009 — when the president set a goal of securing all “vulnerable nuclear material around the world within four years.”

 

“He convened the first summit in Washington in April 2010. That effort was welcomed by many nuclear policy experts who have warned for years that nuclear security was an overlooked and increasingly dangerous vulnerability. Al Qaeda has declared its interest in obtaining nuclear material.”

 

In a conference call with press, Mr Obama’s deputy national security adviser said the DMZ visit is meant to emphasize the bond between the U.S. and South Korea and show support for the U.S. troops stationed there. Al Jazeera reports the trip takes on special significance after an announcement from North Korea last week.

 

“North Korea plans to use a rocket to launch a satellite into orbit. Japan, the U.S. and other countries suspect it’s seeking to test long-range missiles in violation of international grievance.”

 

In light of North Korea’s announcement and President Obama’s visit, South Korean leadership wants to amend a contract with the U.S. limiting their own weaponry. The Christian Science Monitor writes:

 

“In the first substantive response to the North Korean plan, South Korea’s President Lee Myung-bak has indicated he will impress upon President Obama the South’s desire to update a 32-year-old agreement with the US that limits South Korean missiles to a range of 300 kilometers.”

 

And the BBC writes even North Korea’s closest diplomatic partner, China, is a little nervous about North Korea’s plans. In a statement released over the weekend, Chinese Deputy Foreign Minister Zhang Zhijun said:

 

“‘We sincerely hope parties concerned stay calm and exercise restraint and avoid escalation of tension that may lead to a more complicated situation’ ... On Saturday, [North Korea] said it had told the relevant international bodies about the launch, and would invite foreign experts and journalists to watch.”

 

Russia called North Korea’s plans a “serious concern.” But it’s Japan that’s chosen to take action. Bloomberg reports North Korea’s neighbors to the east are taking a close look at interceptor missiles.

 

“Tokyo says it hasn’t ruled out shooting the rocket down if it violates Japanese air space. The defense minister says Japan is considering how best to respond to this rocket.”

 

This all comes just a few weeks after Kim Jong Un agreed to suspend North Korea's missile program in return for U.S. food aid. The BBC reports North Korea plans to launch the satellite just in time for the 100th anniversary of the birth of Kim Il Sung — the nation’s founder and grandfather of the current leader.

View More
Comments
Newsy
www2