(Image source: Department of Defense)

BY COLLIN RUANE
ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE

Just over a month away from President Obama’s second inauguration ceremony, but it might be a little different this time around.

“He will take the oath of office twice; the first on January 20th in a private ceremony.”

“They have to do that because that's the day he needs to be sworn in. The public ceremony will be on the Capitol steps the next day.”

President Obama’s 2009 inauguration saw a record crowd of 1.5 million people, but the upcoming inauguration is expected to have less fanfare.

A writer for CBS News says: “...due to the lingering economic anxiety ... officials are striving to project a more somber, low-key tone.”

But why does it have to be private? Traditionally, when January 20th falls on a Sunday, the ceremony is private, with public events the next day.

Such was the case for James Monroe, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and Ronald Reagan, among others.

But this time, some in the press are fighting back.

Politico reports, the White House Correspondents Association is urging the administration to allow press access to the private swearing-in.

No word yet on if the press will have access to the private ceremony.

Obama Set to Have 'Private' Swearing-In

by Collin Ruane
0
Transcript
Dec 7, 2012

Obama Set to Have 'Private' Swearing-In

(Image source: Department of Defense)

BY COLLIN RUANE
ANCHOR LOGAN TITTLE

Just over a month away from President Obama’s second inauguration ceremony, but it might be a little different this time around.

“He will take the oath of office twice; the first on January 20th in a private ceremony.”

“They have to do that because that's the day he needs to be sworn in. The public ceremony will be on the Capitol steps the next day.”

President Obama’s 2009 inauguration saw a record crowd of 1.5 million people, but the upcoming inauguration is expected to have less fanfare.

A writer for CBS News says: “...due to the lingering economic anxiety ... officials are striving to project a more somber, low-key tone.”

But why does it have to be private? Traditionally, when January 20th falls on a Sunday, the ceremony is private, with public events the next day.

Such was the case for James Monroe, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight Eisenhower, and Ronald Reagan, among others.

But this time, some in the press are fighting back.

Politico reports, the White House Correspondents Association is urging the administration to allow press access to the private swearing-in.

No word yet on if the press will have access to the private ceremony.

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