(Image Source: Carnegie Endowment)
 
BY CHRISTIAN BRYANT

President Obama began his first international tour since reelection Saturday. Sky News remarks on one item of the President’s four-day, Southeast Asia itinerary.

“He’s expected to reinforce America’s influence in the region which has been dominated by China.”

President Obama will make an appearance at the East Asia Summit and also make history while abroad; he’ll become the first sitting president to visit Cambodia and Myanmar — or Burma. Obama’s national security advisor spoke to reporters about supporting Myanmar on its road to democracy.

“There’s a lot more to be done and we’re not going to miss this moment in terms of our opportunity to push this along... and try to lock in reform and lock in this path forward as best we can.”

New York Daily News reports a focus on supporting Myanmar  is especially significant given that the country “...has a poor record of human rights and still holds thousands of political prisoners on questionable charges.”

But matters stateside continue to fester as the president and his administration face harsh criticism from Republicans over the handling of the 9/11 attack in Benghazi. One writer for the New York Times says it’s smart for Obama to turn his attention to China.

“The Middle East is likely to remain a top priority, but he is right to also focus on Asia, where China’s growing assertiveness presents a challenge.”

This trip will serve as Obama’s fourth to the region since being elected to office in 2008.

Obama’s Attention on Myanmar During Asian Tour

by
1
Transcript
Nov 17, 2012

Obama’s Attention on Myanmar During Asian Tour

 

(Image Source: Carnegie Endowment)
 
BY CHRISTIAN BRYANT

President Obama began his first international tour since reelection Saturday. Sky News remarks on one item of the President’s four-day, Southeast Asia itinerary.

“He’s expected to reinforce America’s influence in the region which has been dominated by China.”

President Obama will make an appearance at the East Asia Summit and also make history while abroad; he’ll become the first sitting president to visit Cambodia and Myanmar — or Burma. Obama’s national security advisor spoke to reporters about supporting Myanmar on its road to democracy.

“There’s a lot more to be done and we’re not going to miss this moment in terms of our opportunity to push this along... and try to lock in reform and lock in this path forward as best we can.”

New York Daily News reports a focus on supporting Myanmar  is especially significant given that the country “...has a poor record of human rights and still holds thousands of political prisoners on questionable charges.”

But matters stateside continue to fester as the president and his administration face harsh criticism from Republicans over the handling of the 9/11 attack in Benghazi. One writer for the New York Times says it’s smart for Obama to turn his attention to China.

“The Middle East is likely to remain a top priority, but he is right to also focus on Asia, where China’s growing assertiveness presents a challenge.”

This trip will serve as Obama’s fourth to the region since being elected to office in 2008.
View More
Comments
Newsy
www1