(Image source: ABC News)


BY ZACH TOOMBS 


The shooting of a black Florida teenager at the hands of a neighborhood watch captain has sparked a national conversation about race. On Friday, President Barack Obama weighed in, making his first public comments on the death of Trayvon Martin.

“You know, if I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon ... All of us as Americans are going to take this with the seriousness it deserves and we will get to the bottom of exactly what happened."

This week, several hundred protesters joined the Million Hoodie March in New York City — meant as a call for justice in the Trayvon Martin case.

George Zimmerman, the man accused of pursuing and then gunning down the Florida teenager, claims he shot Martin in self-defense. As of Friday evening, he has not faced arrest.

The president’s remarks came during an unrelated Rose Garden announcement. Shortly after his comments, Martin’s family released a brief statement. From The Huffington Post, it reads:

"The President's personal comments touched us deeply and made us wonder: If his son looked liked Trayvon and wore a hoodie, would he be suspicious too?"

But Mr. Obama wasn’t the only candidate in the running for the White House to comment on the Martin killing Friday. GOP candidates Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich gave their remarks in interviews — Mitt Romney in a written statement. CNN has it.

SANTORUM: “It’s chilling to hear what happened.

GINGRICH: “While this is a tragedy — and it is a tragedy — we’re going to relentlessly seeks justice, and I think that’s the right thing to do.”

ERIN BURNETT (READING ROMNEY STATEMENT): “There needs to be a thorough investigation that reassures the public that justice is carried out with impartiality and integrity.”

Throughout Friday, pundits voiced concerns that the Martin case might become too political — a fear that the killing could become an election year flashpoint. MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry was among them.

“As important as this is about the politics of whether or not the Justice Department actually has the basis for moving in on this, I’m worried if this becomes a partisan politics, because it should not be.”

And The Grio, a news site focusing on African-American issues, contrasts Mr. Obama’s comments on the Martin case with his remarks on a racial controversy that made headlines three years ago, writing:

“His decision to comment illustrated the intense public attention on the case. But the president was much more careful than in 2009, when he blasted police in Cambridge for their arrest of Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. … Still, Obama could have said nothing...”
 

 

Obama: 'If I Had a Son, He'd Look Like Trayvon'

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Mar 24, 2012

Obama: 'If I Had a Son, He'd Look Like Trayvon'

 


(Image source: ABC News)


BY ZACH TOOMBS 


The shooting of a black Florida teenager at the hands of a neighborhood watch captain has sparked a national conversation about race. On Friday, President Barack Obama weighed in, making his first public comments on the death of Trayvon Martin.

“You know, if I had a son, he’d look like Trayvon ... All of us as Americans are going to take this with the seriousness it deserves and we will get to the bottom of exactly what happened."

This week, several hundred protesters joined the Million Hoodie March in New York City — meant as a call for justice in the Trayvon Martin case.

George Zimmerman, the man accused of pursuing and then gunning down the Florida teenager, claims he shot Martin in self-defense. As of Friday evening, he has not faced arrest.

The president’s remarks came during an unrelated Rose Garden announcement. Shortly after his comments, Martin’s family released a brief statement. From The Huffington Post, it reads:

"The President's personal comments touched us deeply and made us wonder: If his son looked liked Trayvon and wore a hoodie, would he be suspicious too?"

But Mr. Obama wasn’t the only candidate in the running for the White House to comment on the Martin killing Friday. GOP candidates Rick Santorum and Newt Gingrich gave their remarks in interviews — Mitt Romney in a written statement. CNN has it.

SANTORUM: “It’s chilling to hear what happened.

GINGRICH: “While this is a tragedy — and it is a tragedy — we’re going to relentlessly seeks justice, and I think that’s the right thing to do.”

ERIN BURNETT (READING ROMNEY STATEMENT): “There needs to be a thorough investigation that reassures the public that justice is carried out with impartiality and integrity.”

Throughout Friday, pundits voiced concerns that the Martin case might become too political — a fear that the killing could become an election year flashpoint. MSNBC’s Melissa Harris-Perry was among them.

“As important as this is about the politics of whether or not the Justice Department actually has the basis for moving in on this, I’m worried if this becomes a partisan politics, because it should not be.”

And The Grio, a news site focusing on African-American issues, contrasts Mr. Obama’s comments on the Martin case with his remarks on a racial controversy that made headlines three years ago, writing:

“His decision to comment illustrated the intense public attention on the case. But the president was much more careful than in 2009, when he blasted police in Cambridge for their arrest of Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. … Still, Obama could have said nothing...”
 

 

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