(Image source: The New York Times)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Four more years for President Barack Obama.

 

With more than 300 electoral votes under his belt and a slim lead in the popular vote, Obama touted trademark high-flying rhetoric in his victory speech from Chicago.

 

“We have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back. And we know in our hearts that, for the United States of America, the best is yet to come.”

 

Obama’s win was called early, just after projections showed him winning Ohio and sending him over the magic number of 270 electoral votes.

 

That call was early enough that it preceded results from some big swing states — including Nevada, Colorado, Virginia and Florida. Despite the millions of dollars spent there during the election, Ohio plus a collection of northern states were enough for Obama.

 

That might have been one factor behind a delay in GOP challenger Mitt Romney’s concession. He took the stage for a brief speech around 1 a.m. eastern time.

 

“I so wish that I had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. But the nation chose another leader. And so, Ann and I join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation.”

 

On Twitter, the election unsurprisingly broke a slew of traffic records. 20 million Tweets made it the most tweeted political event in U.S. history.

 

So, how did he do it? With a strong showing across the rust belt and in a handful of Midwestern states.

 

Obama picked up battleground states including Nevada, Colorado, Iowa and Wisconsin. And despite an early Romney lead there, picked up Virginia as well. Of course, it was the all-important Ohio that put him over the top.

 

The New York Times was quick to point to a pair of impending obstacles for Obama. Although he survived re-election during a rough economic climate, the debt-reducing so-called fiscal cliff awaits — and the balance of power in Congress hasn’t changed.

 

“[Mr. Obama] faces governing in a deeply divided country and a partisan-rich capital, where Republicans retained their majority in the House ... His re-election offers him a second chance that will quickly be tested, given the rapidly escalating fiscal showdown.”

Obama: 'Best is Yet to Come'

by Zach Toombs
0
Transcript
Nov 7, 2012

Obama: 'Best is Yet to Come'

(Image source: The New York Times)

 

 

BY ZACH TOOMBS

 

 

Four more years for President Barack Obama.

 

With more than 300 electoral votes under his belt and a slim lead in the popular vote, Obama touted trademark high-flying rhetoric in his victory speech from Chicago.

 

“We have picked ourselves up, we have fought our way back. And we know in our hearts that, for the United States of America, the best is yet to come.”

 

Obama’s win was called early, just after projections showed him winning Ohio and sending him over the magic number of 270 electoral votes.

 

That call was early enough that it preceded results from some big swing states — including Nevada, Colorado, Virginia and Florida. Despite the millions of dollars spent there during the election, Ohio plus a collection of northern states were enough for Obama.

 

That might have been one factor behind a delay in GOP challenger Mitt Romney’s concession. He took the stage for a brief speech around 1 a.m. eastern time.

 

“I so wish that I had been able to fulfill your hopes to lead the country in a different direction. But the nation chose another leader. And so, Ann and I join with you to earnestly pray for him and for this great nation.”

 

On Twitter, the election unsurprisingly broke a slew of traffic records. 20 million Tweets made it the most tweeted political event in U.S. history.

 

So, how did he do it? With a strong showing across the rust belt and in a handful of Midwestern states.

 

Obama picked up battleground states including Nevada, Colorado, Iowa and Wisconsin. And despite an early Romney lead there, picked up Virginia as well. Of course, it was the all-important Ohio that put him over the top.

 

The New York Times was quick to point to a pair of impending obstacles for Obama. Although he survived re-election during a rough economic climate, the debt-reducing so-called fiscal cliff awaits — and the balance of power in Congress hasn’t changed.

 

“[Mr. Obama] faces governing in a deeply divided country and a partisan-rich capital, where Republicans retained their majority in the House ... His re-election offers him a second chance that will quickly be tested, given the rapidly escalating fiscal showdown.”

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