(Image Source: CBS)

BY GINA COOK

ANCHOR EMILY SPAIN

Ever been creeped out by how well online advertisers seem to know you? Well, you might not have to worry about that anymore. The federal government announced it is introducing an online privacy bill of rights that will give consumers the option to avoid being tracked by companies.

HLN says its a start.


“Basically they’re just getting the ball rolling, you know, it’s not law but right now there is no line drawn in the sand about what’s okay and what’s not okay.”

And CNN explains how this gives more power to the consumer.

“It gives consumers the right to expect companies to disclose how they’re going to handle their personal data, also requires companies to inform consumers about the security risks associated with handling their personal information.”

In addition to the bill comes the “Do Not Track” technology advertising networks associated with Google, Yahoo and Microsoft say they’ve agree to.  It’s a setting that prevents sites from sending out personalized ads.

A writer for Forbes says this could actually have serious costs for consumers and writes,

“...critics who say such data collection is ‘creepy’ raise privacy concerns and call for regulation. But they won’t likely have as many online choices if a new regulatory regime steps in and slays the goose (advertising and data collection) that lays the Internet’s free golden eggs (“free” sites and services).”

And according to Bloomberg, internet users need to be aware that they aren’t the customers --but the product of online companies, like Google, Pandora and Facebook -- saying,

“When we demand that they not track us, remember us, store our information, or take notice of what we like, we are in fact telling them to give us something for nothing. That’s not how business works.”

But a blogger for Wired disagrees, saying this kind of bill of rights is long over due.

“Finally, after a decade of online privacy debacles and lip-service to self-regulation, originating from Google, Facebook, the Network Advertising Initiative and scores of others, it’s finally time for online companies to start treating users and their data with some modicum of respect.”

Obama Administration Reveals Online Privacy Bill of Rights

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Feb 24, 2012

Obama Administration Reveals Online Privacy Bill of Rights

(Image Source: CBS)

BY GINA COOK

ANCHOR EMILY SPAIN

Ever been creeped out by how well online advertisers seem to know you? Well, you might not have to worry about that anymore. The federal government announced it is introducing an online privacy bill of rights that will give consumers the option to avoid being tracked by companies.

HLN says its a start.


“Basically they’re just getting the ball rolling, you know, it’s not law but right now there is no line drawn in the sand about what’s okay and what’s not okay.”

And CNN explains how this gives more power to the consumer.

“It gives consumers the right to expect companies to disclose how they’re going to handle their personal data, also requires companies to inform consumers about the security risks associated with handling their personal information.”

In addition to the bill comes the “Do Not Track” technology advertising networks associated with Google, Yahoo and Microsoft say they’ve agree to.  It’s a setting that prevents sites from sending out personalized ads.

A writer for Forbes says this could actually have serious costs for consumers and writes,

“...critics who say such data collection is ‘creepy’ raise privacy concerns and call for regulation. But they won’t likely have as many online choices if a new regulatory regime steps in and slays the goose (advertising and data collection) that lays the Internet’s free golden eggs (“free” sites and services).”

And according to Bloomberg, internet users need to be aware that they aren’t the customers --but the product of online companies, like Google, Pandora and Facebook -- saying,

“When we demand that they not track us, remember us, store our information, or take notice of what we like, we are in fact telling them to give us something for nothing. That’s not how business works.”

But a blogger for Wired disagrees, saying this kind of bill of rights is long over due.

“Finally, after a decade of online privacy debacles and lip-service to self-regulation, originating from Google, Facebook, the Network Advertising Initiative and scores of others, it’s finally time for online companies to start treating users and their data with some modicum of respect.”

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