(Image source: United Nations)


 

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN


 

In 1961 a plane crash killed then-Secretary General of the United Nations Dag Hammarskjold. The accident has long been considered one of the biggest mysteries out of the Cold War. (Via United Nations)

 

“The serious, quietly courageous Swedish diplomat was to bring new stature to the job of chief administrative officer of the UN. And in his quest for peace, he met death.” (Via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer)

 

A 1962 UN investigation wasn’t able to find a cause of the crash.

 

At the time, Hammarskjold was on his way to the Congo to broker a ceasefire. It reportedly took 15 hours to find the wreckage of the plane even though it was only a few miles from the airport. (Via YouTube / HammarskjoldProject)

 

The mystery of the crash is a favorite among conspiracy theorists. But now — in a fascinating twist — the U.S. National Security Agency could have information about the cause of that crash.

 

A four-member commission reviewing what happened said Monday the NSA, the United States’ electronic spying agency,  was very likely recording radio transmissions near where the plane crashed. (Via NSA)

 

What follows, of course, is the question of whether U.S. intelligence could lend any information about the cause of the crash. It filed Freedom of Information Act requests to the NSA archive. Those requests were denied on national security grounds, which the commission is appealing.

 

The commission concluded it IS possible to determine whether an aerial attack had anything to do with the crash, and the commission is recommending the UN reopen an investigation, calling Hammarskjold’s death an event of global significance which deserves the attention both of history and of justice.”

 

NSA Could Hold Key to Cold War Mystery

by Christina Hartman
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Transcript
Sep 9, 2013

NSA Could Hold Key to Cold War Mystery

(Image source: United Nations)


 

BY CHRISTINA HARTMAN


 

In 1961 a plane crash killed then-Secretary General of the United Nations Dag Hammarskjold. The accident has long been considered one of the biggest mysteries out of the Cold War. (Via United Nations)

 

“The serious, quietly courageous Swedish diplomat was to bring new stature to the job of chief administrative officer of the UN. And in his quest for peace, he met death.” (Via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer)

 

A 1962 UN investigation wasn’t able to find a cause of the crash.

 

At the time, Hammarskjold was on his way to the Congo to broker a ceasefire. It reportedly took 15 hours to find the wreckage of the plane even though it was only a few miles from the airport. (Via YouTube / HammarskjoldProject)

 

The mystery of the crash is a favorite among conspiracy theorists. But now — in a fascinating twist — the U.S. National Security Agency could have information about the cause of that crash.

 

A four-member commission reviewing what happened said Monday the NSA, the United States’ electronic spying agency,  was very likely recording radio transmissions near where the plane crashed. (Via NSA)

 

What follows, of course, is the question of whether U.S. intelligence could lend any information about the cause of the crash. It filed Freedom of Information Act requests to the NSA archive. Those requests were denied on national security grounds, which the commission is appealing.

 

The commission concluded it IS possible to determine whether an aerial attack had anything to do with the crash, and the commission is recommending the UN reopen an investigation, calling Hammarskjold’s death an event of global significance which deserves the attention both of history and of justice.”

 
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