(Image source: Glassdoor / Flickr / tvol)

 

 

BY DANNY MATTESON

 

 

Citing a budget deficit of more than $6 million, NPR announced Friday it will offer voluntary buyouts to employees in an attempt to reduce staffing levels by as much as 10 percent. 

 

The announcement came in a press release Friday that outlined the radio company’s projected finances for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1. It included revenue of $178.1 million, expenses of $183 million, and a deficit of $6.1 million, or around 3 percent of revenue. (Via NPR)

 

According to The Washington Post, the company currently employs around 840 people and estimates it would need to reduce staff by 80-84 to meet its goals. 

 

NPR last made cuts to its staff in 2008 when it laid off 64 employees — about 8 percent of the company’s personnel. (Via Los Angeles Times)

 

As Southern California Public Radio notes, the staff reduction plan would be part of a larger effort by NPR to have a balanced budget in fiscal year 2015 by lowering its expenses and making investments into the network’s digital future and ‘revenue generating initiatives.’”

 

Also packed into the same press release was the announcement of 64-year-old California businessman Paul Haaga Jr. as the company’s interim CEO. (Via NPR)

 

Haaga, an NPR board member and chairman of an investment firm, will fill the void left by Gary Knell starting Sept. 30. (Via Vimeo / Investment Company Institute)

 

Knell, who held the position for nearly two years after coming to the company from the Sesame Workshop, will become the CEO of National Geographic. (Via Wikimedia Commons)  

 

No details have yet been released on the company’s buyout plans.  

NPR to Offer Voluntary Buyouts, Names Interim CEO

by Danny Matteson
0
Transcript
Sep 13, 2013

NPR to Offer Voluntary Buyouts, Names Interim CEO

(Image source: Glassdoor / Flickr / tvol)

 

 

BY DANNY MATTESON

 

 

Citing a budget deficit of more than $6 million, NPR announced Friday it will offer voluntary buyouts to employees in an attempt to reduce staffing levels by as much as 10 percent. 

 

The announcement came in a press release Friday that outlined the radio company’s projected finances for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1. It included revenue of $178.1 million, expenses of $183 million, and a deficit of $6.1 million, or around 3 percent of revenue. (Via NPR)

 

According to The Washington Post, the company currently employs around 840 people and estimates it would need to reduce staff by 80-84 to meet its goals. 

 

NPR last made cuts to its staff in 2008 when it laid off 64 employees — about 8 percent of the company’s personnel. (Via Los Angeles Times)

 

As Southern California Public Radio notes, the staff reduction plan would be part of a larger effort by NPR to have a balanced budget in fiscal year 2015 by lowering its expenses and making investments into the network’s digital future and ‘revenue generating initiatives.’”

 

Also packed into the same press release was the announcement of 64-year-old California businessman Paul Haaga Jr. as the company’s interim CEO. (Via NPR)

 

Haaga, an NPR board member and chairman of an investment firm, will fill the void left by Gary Knell starting Sept. 30. (Via Vimeo / Investment Company Institute)

 

Knell, who held the position for nearly two years after coming to the company from the Sesame Workshop, will become the CEO of National Geographic. (Via Wikimedia Commons)  

 

No details have yet been released on the company’s buyout plans.  

View More
Comments
Newsy
www2