(Image Source: euronews

BY VICTORIA CRAIG

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES

A massive failure. That’s what many are calling the result of a North Korean rocket test launch into space Friday. NBC’s “Today” has the details.

“U.S. officials say within 90 seconds of the launch of that rocket, it appeared to just fall apart in the mid-air, dozens of pieces that fell harmlessly into the Yellow Sea just west of the Korean peninsula.”

North Korea insisted the launch was not an attempt to test long-range nuclear missiles. But Al Jazeera reports — world leaders were not convinced and condemned the launch.

“While Pyongyang said the mission was intended to send a weather satellite into space, the launch focused renewed attention on North Korea's technology ambitions, including the development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.”

The North invited international journalists to the site to document what they hoped would be a successful launch. But as a reporter for CNN explains, the celebration turned to embarrassment for the nation and its leaders.  

“You can’t understate what an embarrassment this is. Not just because the media are here, because this was meant to be the pinnacle of the massive celebration planned for the centenary of the birth of the founding father of the country, Kim Il Sung.”

This launch isn’t the first of its kind from North Korea. But as ABC notes, it is the first time the nation has admitted failure.  The Washington Post explains the historical significance — citing a previous failed attempt to launch a satellite in 2009 which the UN Security Council condemned. The UN then demanded that North Korea stop nuclear tests.

“Days later, the North condemned the [UN] statement and dropped out of the six-party talks process, aimed at persuading the country to give up its weapons. In May, the North then conducted its second underground nuclear test.”

So what’s next? A reporter for ABC’s “Good Morning America” says many analysts believe more nuclear tests are imminent.

“There were already fears that the North Koreans would try to test another nuclear device, this time a uranium device. So everyone is bracing themselves for that development.”

The Telegraph reports UN resolutions ban North Korea from testing long-range missiles that could be used to launch a satellite or a nuclear warhead. It reports the nation could have up to eight plutonium-fuelled atom bombs and is working on uranium-based devices.

North Korea's Rocket Test 'A Failure'

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Apr 13, 2012

North Korea's Rocket Test 'A Failure'

(Image Source: euronews

BY VICTORIA CRAIG

ANCHOR LAUREN GORES

A massive failure. That’s what many are calling the result of a North Korean rocket test launch into space Friday. NBC’s “Today” has the details.

“U.S. officials say within 90 seconds of the launch of that rocket, it appeared to just fall apart in the mid-air, dozens of pieces that fell harmlessly into the Yellow Sea just west of the Korean peninsula.”

North Korea insisted the launch was not an attempt to test long-range nuclear missiles. But Al Jazeera reports — world leaders were not convinced and condemned the launch.

“While Pyongyang said the mission was intended to send a weather satellite into space, the launch focused renewed attention on North Korea's technology ambitions, including the development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles.”

The North invited international journalists to the site to document what they hoped would be a successful launch. But as a reporter for CNN explains, the celebration turned to embarrassment for the nation and its leaders.  

“You can’t understate what an embarrassment this is. Not just because the media are here, because this was meant to be the pinnacle of the massive celebration planned for the centenary of the birth of the founding father of the country, Kim Il Sung.”

This launch isn’t the first of its kind from North Korea. But as ABC notes, it is the first time the nation has admitted failure.  The Washington Post explains the historical significance — citing a previous failed attempt to launch a satellite in 2009 which the UN Security Council condemned. The UN then demanded that North Korea stop nuclear tests.

“Days later, the North condemned the [UN] statement and dropped out of the six-party talks process, aimed at persuading the country to give up its weapons. In May, the North then conducted its second underground nuclear test.”

So what’s next? A reporter for ABC’s “Good Morning America” says many analysts believe more nuclear tests are imminent.

“There were already fears that the North Koreans would try to test another nuclear device, this time a uranium device. So everyone is bracing themselves for that development.”

The Telegraph reports UN resolutions ban North Korea from testing long-range missiles that could be used to launch a satellite or a nuclear warhead. It reports the nation could have up to eight plutonium-fuelled atom bombs and is working on uranium-based devices.

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