(Image Source: Conservative Daily News)

 

 
BY VICTORIA CRAIG

 

It was a night with no knockout punches. Nothing shocking. No surprises.
That’s the general consensus from the media after a not-so-spectacular Super Tuesday.

CNN: “No Knockout Blow for Mitt Romney”
Fox News:“Romney’s Night – But No Knockout”
WSJ: “Romney Scores, But Race Drags On”
NYT: “In a Bruising Battle, No Knockout Punch”

Los Angeles’ KTTV has the results of Tuesday’s primary and caucus victories and what they mean the morning after.

“Super Tuesday is followed by bye-bye Wednesday...But don’t expect that to happen this year. Republican Mitt Romney certainly won six Super Tuesday contests, Rick Santorum winning three..and Newt Gingrich winning his home state of Georgia.”

In previous years, Super Tuesday was full of must-win opportunities. But on this Wednesday-after, the candidates are pretty much where they were on Monday — living to fight another day for the GOP nomination. CNBC’s Jim Cramer follows the money in this 2012 GOP nomination battle.

“What is going on that all of Romney’s money is not translating to big popular votes? Santorum’s giving winning speeches. And then Gingrich, winning speeches. These guys were supposed to go home. It used to be win big or go home. Now it’s win big or call Shelton Ailes and get more money.”

Some analysts suggest the change could be due to a lack of voter enthusiasm. Fox News shares exit poll data from Monday night’s contests.

“Four in 10 say they like their candidate when they vote for Mitt Romney but they have reservations about them. Thirty-nine percent said that about Rick Santorum. That goes to the basic issue of whether people are enthusiastic about these candidates.”

That lack of enthusiasm could translate into a longer battle for the candidates. CBS explains.

“The Romney campaign certainly hoped to wrap up this nomination early...Super Tuesday has not settled the GOP race, and Mitt Romney has not settled GOP voters' doubts. Which means the fight for the Republican presidential nomination likely just got a whole lot longer.”  

Despite yesterday’s lack of sparkle, it was still a big day for Romney. He won a very close battle in Ohio in what many are calling a “squeaker of a win” over Rick Santorum. CNN explains why this must-win was a big “W” for the Romney camp.

“Winning gets you what? It gets you delegates...Governor Romney came into Super Tuesday with just about 200. He ends above 400. That is a big gain on a big day. It takes 1144 to win. Nobody is close to Romney and that is his advantage going forward.”  

So what’s next for the four-candidate-field of GOP presidential hopefuls? They’ll head south to face-off in a host of primaries and caucuses. The Wall Street Journal outlines what’s at stake for Tuesday’s Ohio-victor in the South.



“ ...A set of Southern states...will test Mitt Romney's ability to reach evangelical Christians and conservative Republicans, who have been slow to embrace him in a number of prior contests. Mr. Romney's performance...could allow him to show new strength in a region where he has been badly beaten once.”

 

The candidates head to Kansas on March 10, followed by Alabama, Hawaii, and Mississippi on the 13 and Missouri March 17.

No Big Surprises Super Tuesday

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Mar 7, 2012

No Big Surprises Super Tuesday

(Image Source: Conservative Daily News)

 

 
BY VICTORIA CRAIG

 

It was a night with no knockout punches. Nothing shocking. No surprises.
That’s the general consensus from the media after a not-so-spectacular Super Tuesday.

CNN: “No Knockout Blow for Mitt Romney”
Fox News:“Romney’s Night – But No Knockout”
WSJ: “Romney Scores, But Race Drags On”
NYT: “In a Bruising Battle, No Knockout Punch”

Los Angeles’ KTTV has the results of Tuesday’s primary and caucus victories and what they mean the morning after.

“Super Tuesday is followed by bye-bye Wednesday...But don’t expect that to happen this year. Republican Mitt Romney certainly won six Super Tuesday contests, Rick Santorum winning three..and Newt Gingrich winning his home state of Georgia.”

In previous years, Super Tuesday was full of must-win opportunities. But on this Wednesday-after, the candidates are pretty much where they were on Monday — living to fight another day for the GOP nomination. CNBC’s Jim Cramer follows the money in this 2012 GOP nomination battle.

“What is going on that all of Romney’s money is not translating to big popular votes? Santorum’s giving winning speeches. And then Gingrich, winning speeches. These guys were supposed to go home. It used to be win big or go home. Now it’s win big or call Shelton Ailes and get more money.”

Some analysts suggest the change could be due to a lack of voter enthusiasm. Fox News shares exit poll data from Monday night’s contests.

“Four in 10 say they like their candidate when they vote for Mitt Romney but they have reservations about them. Thirty-nine percent said that about Rick Santorum. That goes to the basic issue of whether people are enthusiastic about these candidates.”

That lack of enthusiasm could translate into a longer battle for the candidates. CBS explains.

“The Romney campaign certainly hoped to wrap up this nomination early...Super Tuesday has not settled the GOP race, and Mitt Romney has not settled GOP voters' doubts. Which means the fight for the Republican presidential nomination likely just got a whole lot longer.”  

Despite yesterday’s lack of sparkle, it was still a big day for Romney. He won a very close battle in Ohio in what many are calling a “squeaker of a win” over Rick Santorum. CNN explains why this must-win was a big “W” for the Romney camp.

“Winning gets you what? It gets you delegates...Governor Romney came into Super Tuesday with just about 200. He ends above 400. That is a big gain on a big day. It takes 1144 to win. Nobody is close to Romney and that is his advantage going forward.”  

So what’s next for the four-candidate-field of GOP presidential hopefuls? They’ll head south to face-off in a host of primaries and caucuses. The Wall Street Journal outlines what’s at stake for Tuesday’s Ohio-victor in the South.



“ ...A set of Southern states...will test Mitt Romney's ability to reach evangelical Christians and conservative Republicans, who have been slow to embrace him in a number of prior contests. Mr. Romney's performance...could allow him to show new strength in a region where he has been badly beaten once.”

 

The candidates head to Kansas on March 10, followed by Alabama, Hawaii, and Mississippi on the 13 and Missouri March 17.

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