(Image Source: Guardian)

 

BY COLLIN RUANE

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, news organizations are scrambling to inform East Coast residents of major developments. The New York Times made an announcement Sunday to make information easily accessible. WTVG has the story.

“But yesterday at 3pm the newspaper dropped its paywall, the so-called paywall, and allowed the full site to be available to everyone.”

The Wall Street Journal and Newsday followed suit shortly thereafter, removing their paywalls as a service to those who will be affected. Mashable reports:

“Visitors will be able to access all content on the site without restriction — not just storm coverage.”

Smart Planet explains newspapers have made exceptions during major news events in the past.

“The paywall...is generally moved on an individual case basis, to prevent users from viewing more than ten articles for free. For example, the wall was [removed] on the eve of Osama bin Laden’s death, and also when Hurricane Irene hit last year.”

In an email to Poynter, New York Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy confirmed …

“The gateway has been removed from the entire site and all apps. The plan is to keep it that way until the weather emergency is over."

Hurricane season is technically not finished, but storms of this intensity are generally uncommon. Surges from New Jersey to Delaware have already made an impact Monday morning.

 

Newspapers Drop Paywalls Ahead of Sandy's Landfall

by Collin Ruane
0
Transcript
Oct 29, 2012

Newspapers Drop Paywalls Ahead of Sandy's Landfall

(Image Source: Guardian)

 

BY COLLIN RUANE

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, news organizations are scrambling to inform East Coast residents of major developments. The New York Times made an announcement Sunday to make information easily accessible. WTVG has the story.

“But yesterday at 3pm the newspaper dropped its paywall, the so-called paywall, and allowed the full site to be available to everyone.”

The Wall Street Journal and Newsday followed suit shortly thereafter, removing their paywalls as a service to those who will be affected. Mashable reports:

“Visitors will be able to access all content on the site without restriction — not just storm coverage.”

Smart Planet explains newspapers have made exceptions during major news events in the past.

“The paywall...is generally moved on an individual case basis, to prevent users from viewing more than ten articles for free. For example, the wall was [removed] on the eve of Osama bin Laden’s death, and also when Hurricane Irene hit last year.”

In an email to Poynter, New York Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy confirmed …

“The gateway has been removed from the entire site and all apps. The plan is to keep it that way until the weather emergency is over."

Hurricane season is technically not finished, but storms of this intensity are generally uncommon. Surges from New Jersey to Delaware have already made an impact Monday morning.

 

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