(Image Source: Flickr)

BY SAMANTHA KUBOTA

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The youngest generation is, like, not the best generation ever. That’s according to The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. KTVI has the story.

"A new study indicates young americans just aren’t that interested in giving back. Sad to hear.
Researchers found that the 'Millennial Generation,' so those born in the 1980s or 90s, are not as community oriented or politically engaged as previously thought."

The Huffington Post elaborates, saying,

“The study found that Millennials were less interested in donating to charities, participating in politics or helping the environment. The results support the so-called ‘Generation Me’ theory over the ‘Generation We’ description often used in reference to today's young people."

This isn’t the first time media...and science...have noticed supposed shortcomings of the “Millennial” Generation. But USA TODAY says it’s not trying to be mean.

“[Researcher Jean] Twenge says her findings are not intended as criticism of millennials: ‘They reflect the culture, and young people show the changes in the culture the strongest'...Still, she says, results ‘need to be taken seriously in terms of their impact on having a generation less interested in helping the community.’”

Other news organizations focused on how it isn’t easy being young and green. The Washington Post reports...

“The findings go against the widespread belief that environmental issues have hit home with today’s young adults, known as millennials, who have grown up amid climate change discussion and the mantra ‘reduce, reuse, recycle.’ The environment is often listed among top concerns of young voters.”

The Indian Express projected that this shift in what’s important to the nation’s young people might explain the generational increase in anxiety, depression and poor mental health.

“...since an emphasis on extrinsic values over intrinsic ones has been linked with distress and declines in psychological well-being.”

And other news organizations like The Atlantic thought this generational shift might not be such a bad thing.

“Millennial disengagement from politics means that change in government might be more difficult or come more slowly, but the tradeoff is a decreased likelihood that people will look to Washington for answers or guidance...The business of the millennials, it appears, is business.”

And Time goes as far to defend millennial attitudes, saying...

“With all the inefficiencies in government, it seems that millennials might just be disenchanted with traditional modes of affecting change.”

New Report Supports 'Generation Me' Label for Millennials

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Mar 17, 2012

New Report Supports 'Generation Me' Label for Millennials

 

(Image Source: Flickr)

BY SAMANTHA KUBOTA

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS


The youngest generation is, like, not the best generation ever. That’s according to The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. KTVI has the story.

"A new study indicates young americans just aren’t that interested in giving back. Sad to hear.
Researchers found that the 'Millennial Generation,' so those born in the 1980s or 90s, are not as community oriented or politically engaged as previously thought."

The Huffington Post elaborates, saying,

“The study found that Millennials were less interested in donating to charities, participating in politics or helping the environment. The results support the so-called ‘Generation Me’ theory over the ‘Generation We’ description often used in reference to today's young people."

This isn’t the first time media...and science...have noticed supposed shortcomings of the “Millennial” Generation. But USA TODAY says it’s not trying to be mean.

“[Researcher Jean] Twenge says her findings are not intended as criticism of millennials: ‘They reflect the culture, and young people show the changes in the culture the strongest'...Still, she says, results ‘need to be taken seriously in terms of their impact on having a generation less interested in helping the community.’”

Other news organizations focused on how it isn’t easy being young and green. The Washington Post reports...

“The findings go against the widespread belief that environmental issues have hit home with today’s young adults, known as millennials, who have grown up amid climate change discussion and the mantra ‘reduce, reuse, recycle.’ The environment is often listed among top concerns of young voters.”

The Indian Express projected that this shift in what’s important to the nation’s young people might explain the generational increase in anxiety, depression and poor mental health.

“...since an emphasis on extrinsic values over intrinsic ones has been linked with distress and declines in psychological well-being.”

And other news organizations like The Atlantic thought this generational shift might not be such a bad thing.

“Millennial disengagement from politics means that change in government might be more difficult or come more slowly, but the tradeoff is a decreased likelihood that people will look to Washington for answers or guidance...The business of the millennials, it appears, is business.”

And Time goes as far to defend millennial attitudes, saying...

“With all the inefficiencies in government, it seems that millennials might just be disenchanted with traditional modes of affecting change.”

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