(Image source: The Verge)

 

BY EVAN THOMAS

 

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

 

Just how much digital storage space do you need? New hard drive tech from Seagate could eventually pack 60TB onto your computer’s hard disk.

 

The secret is a technology called heat-assisted magnetic recording, or HAMR. With HAMR, Seagate has set a new record for data stored per square inch. The company says this will double the capacity of current hard drives and might eventually lead to 60-terabyte single drives.

 

Computerworld explains how Seagate gets such precise control.

 

“At the most basic level, HAMR adds a laser to the hard drive head and uses nanotube-based lubrication to allow the read/write head of a disk drive to get closer to the surface of a spinning platter…”

 

A writer for PC Magazine says that much storage on one set of platters is space overkill.

 

“Right now, I cannot come close to filling up a full terabyte, although if I begin to collect HD video clips, I suppose I could fill a disk. But once I'm up to 60TB, I doubt a lifetime of photography and video editing could ever fill the drive.”

 

But corporations and cloud services need storage, too. Geek.com points out this advance just future-proofed hard drives for everyone.

 

“With the introduction of HAMR, Seagate has effectively guaranteed hard drives will continue to play a role in the storage market for the next decade. Within 5 years we could all be carrying around double-digit terabyte drives in our laptops.”

 

And WebProNews wonders if all that local space will make the cloud obsolete.

 

“Still, one might wonder what the point of local storage will become, as cloud-based storage and computing advances. But 60TB local drives, coupled with 100Mbps internet connections might also make the idea of a cloud a bit pointless as well.”

 

That sort of change isn’t likely to happen overnight, though. Seagate estimates it will take about 10 years to get to that kind of storage density to market.

New Hard Drive Tech Promises 60TB Capacities

by Nathan Giannini
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Transcript
Mar 23, 2012

New Hard Drive Tech Promises 60TB Capacities

(Image source: The Verge)

 

BY EVAN THOMAS

 

ANCHOR MEGAN MURPHY

 

Just how much digital storage space do you need? New hard drive tech from Seagate could eventually pack 60TB onto your computer’s hard disk.

 

The secret is a technology called heat-assisted magnetic recording, or HAMR. With HAMR, Seagate has set a new record for data stored per square inch. The company says this will double the capacity of current hard drives and might eventually lead to 60-terabyte single drives.

 

Computerworld explains how Seagate gets such precise control.

 

“At the most basic level, HAMR adds a laser to the hard drive head and uses nanotube-based lubrication to allow the read/write head of a disk drive to get closer to the surface of a spinning platter…”

 

A writer for PC Magazine says that much storage on one set of platters is space overkill.

 

“Right now, I cannot come close to filling up a full terabyte, although if I begin to collect HD video clips, I suppose I could fill a disk. But once I'm up to 60TB, I doubt a lifetime of photography and video editing could ever fill the drive.”

 

But corporations and cloud services need storage, too. Geek.com points out this advance just future-proofed hard drives for everyone.

 

“With the introduction of HAMR, Seagate has effectively guaranteed hard drives will continue to play a role in the storage market for the next decade. Within 5 years we could all be carrying around double-digit terabyte drives in our laptops.”

 

And WebProNews wonders if all that local space will make the cloud obsolete.

 

“Still, one might wonder what the point of local storage will become, as cloud-based storage and computing advances. But 60TB local drives, coupled with 100Mbps internet connections might also make the idea of a cloud a bit pointless as well.”

 

That sort of change isn’t likely to happen overnight, though. Seagate estimates it will take about 10 years to get to that kind of storage density to market.

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