(Image source: Ocean Conservancy / Cheryl Gerber)

 

 

BY COLLIN RUANE

 


A potentially deadly flesh-eating bacteria is concerning swimmers in the southeast after 10 people died this year in Florida, alone — and now, the media is starting to take notice.

 

Vibrio Vulnificus is commonly found in warm salt water in the Gulf of Mexico, and cases of infections have been reported from states all along the Gulf coast. (Via WZVN)

 

People can become infected by either eating raw oysters or exposing a wound to salt water that has the bacteria in it. In extreme cases, the bacteria can cause some people to get leg amputations. (Via WFTX)


This information might worry some people, but is it really all that new?

 

The answer is no. WKRG reports between 1988 and 2006, about 900 people were infected. The CDC hasn’t been able to collect any newer data on recent infections.

 

The Inquisitr reports the reason more people are getting worried about possibly getting sick is because of increased media attention.

 

Deaths aren’t unusually high this year. So far about 10 people have died in Florida versus nine in 2012 and 11 in 2011. A doctor says most people exposed to the bacteria don’t end up getting sick.

 

In fact, the bacteria is actually found in ocean water across the country, but is more prominent in the warm Gulf waters. People with diseases like cirrhosis and diabetes are at an increased risk for illness. (Via WWSB)


Doctors recommend people should stay aware of the risk of contracting the bacteria, but it shouldn’t keep them from going to the beach altogether.

New Fears Behind Flesh-Eating Bacteria Found in Ocean

by Collin Ruane
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Transcript
Oct 12, 2013

New Fears Behind Flesh-Eating Bacteria Found in Ocean

(Image source: Ocean Conservancy / Cheryl Gerber)

 

 

BY COLLIN RUANE

 


A potentially deadly flesh-eating bacteria is concerning swimmers in the southeast after 10 people died this year in Florida, alone — and now, the media is starting to take notice.

 

Vibrio Vulnificus is commonly found in warm salt water in the Gulf of Mexico, and cases of infections have been reported from states all along the Gulf coast. (Via WZVN)

 

People can become infected by either eating raw oysters or exposing a wound to salt water that has the bacteria in it. In extreme cases, the bacteria can cause some people to get leg amputations. (Via WFTX)


This information might worry some people, but is it really all that new?

 

The answer is no. WKRG reports between 1988 and 2006, about 900 people were infected. The CDC hasn’t been able to collect any newer data on recent infections.

 

The Inquisitr reports the reason more people are getting worried about possibly getting sick is because of increased media attention.

 

Deaths aren’t unusually high this year. So far about 10 people have died in Florida versus nine in 2012 and 11 in 2011. A doctor says most people exposed to the bacteria don’t end up getting sick.

 

In fact, the bacteria is actually found in ocean water across the country, but is more prominent in the warm Gulf waters. People with diseases like cirrhosis and diabetes are at an increased risk for illness. (Via WWSB)


Doctors recommend people should stay aware of the risk of contracting the bacteria, but it shouldn’t keep them from going to the beach altogether.

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