(Image: New York Daily News)

 

BY CHRISTINE KARSTEN

 

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

Doctors are able to identify risk factors — but they can’t predict heart attacks... yet.  WOFL reports, researchers may have found a blood test that makes prediction possible.

 

“The test checks the level of misshapen cells off the lining of the blood vessels. If high levels of these cells are found in the blood then developers say that person may be at a higher risk of a heart attack.”

 

Researchers from the Scripps Translational Science Institute took blood samples from 50 patients who went to the emergency room with heart attack symptoms. They used blood samples from 44 healthy individuals as a control.

 

CNN reports — the scientists found several key differences in the circulating endothelial cells or CEC’s.

 

“For starters, four times as many endothelial cells were circulating in the blood of patients on the verge of a heart attack. The endothelial cells were also larger, misshapen and frequently contained many nuclei.”

 

Currently there are a number of tests doctors can perform in the ER to see if someone is experiencing a heart attack or has had one recently. TIME says this study will provide a timeframe for when a possible heart attack could happen.

 

“It’s also becoming clear that the CECs start sloughing off the vessel walls a few days to a week or so before fatty plaques rupture and form blood clots, causing a heart attack. That means that testing for CECs can help doctors predict who is on the verge of having an event.”

 

A medical professor at Duke University tells the LA Times — the results from this study are useful — but....

 

“...more study was needed to flesh out and confirm the results, and to prepare a test for patients. The methods presented in the Scripps research may be too complicated for use in a doctor's office or an emergency room.”

 

My Health News Daily says it’s too soon to say whether or not this test works because the patients involved in the study were already having a heart attack and not on the brink of one. Other experts say it’s possible the test identified a cause — rather than an effect of a heart attack.

New Blood Test Could Predict Heart Attacks

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Mar 23, 2012

New Blood Test Could Predict Heart Attacks

(Image: New York Daily News)

 

BY CHRISTINE KARSTEN

 

ANCHOR CHRISTINA HARTMAN

 

Doctors are able to identify risk factors — but they can’t predict heart attacks... yet.  WOFL reports, researchers may have found a blood test that makes prediction possible.

 

“The test checks the level of misshapen cells off the lining of the blood vessels. If high levels of these cells are found in the blood then developers say that person may be at a higher risk of a heart attack.”

 

Researchers from the Scripps Translational Science Institute took blood samples from 50 patients who went to the emergency room with heart attack symptoms. They used blood samples from 44 healthy individuals as a control.

 

CNN reports — the scientists found several key differences in the circulating endothelial cells or CEC’s.

 

“For starters, four times as many endothelial cells were circulating in the blood of patients on the verge of a heart attack. The endothelial cells were also larger, misshapen and frequently contained many nuclei.”

 

Currently there are a number of tests doctors can perform in the ER to see if someone is experiencing a heart attack or has had one recently. TIME says this study will provide a timeframe for when a possible heart attack could happen.

 

“It’s also becoming clear that the CECs start sloughing off the vessel walls a few days to a week or so before fatty plaques rupture and form blood clots, causing a heart attack. That means that testing for CECs can help doctors predict who is on the verge of having an event.”

 

A medical professor at Duke University tells the LA Times — the results from this study are useful — but....

 

“...more study was needed to flesh out and confirm the results, and to prepare a test for patients. The methods presented in the Scripps research may be too complicated for use in a doctor's office or an emergency room.”

 

My Health News Daily says it’s too soon to say whether or not this test works because the patients involved in the study were already having a heart attack and not on the brink of one. Other experts say it’s possible the test identified a cause — rather than an effect of a heart attack.

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