(Image Source: Youtube/SadEngineerStudios


 

BY SCOTT MALONE

 


Asking someone you meet at a bar if they’re your cousin is probably not the best way to break the ice. But apparently it’s such an important piece of information in Iceland that there’s now an app for that.


The Islendinga App allows users to bump smartphones, and if you both share a grandparent it will set off an alarm and send you a text message as part of the — quote — “Incest Spoiler” feature. (Via WOLO)


Three University of Iceland students developed the app as part of a contest to make “new creative uses” of the Book of Icelanders — the country’s extensive genealogical database which traces the lineage of its current citizens back roughly 1,200 years.


A writer for Popular Science notes most of the country’s 320,000 people share a common descent from ninth century Viking settlers, and because of that “the danger probably lies more in kissing your second cousins.”


And apparently that occurs a little too often. Medical Daily quotes one of the app’s developers, saying:


“Everyone has heard the story of going to a family event and running into a girl you hooked up with some time ago. It’s not a good feeling when you realize that girl is a second cousin. People may think it’s funny, but [the app] is a necessity.”


Yes, he really called an app with an “Incest Spoiler” feature a necessity. But wouldn’t meeting someone with the same last name of one of your relatives be an immediate red flag? A writer for Wired explains the name game isn’t reliable in Iceland.


“Part of the problem ... is that Icelandic naming conventions don’t reflect someone’s descendants. ... Each new generation has a completely different name to the name of the generation that preceded it.”


So that means your cousins, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews could all have different last names.


Businessweek points out the app has other convenient features, like a calendar to remind users of their relatives’ birthdays.


The Android app has been downloaded almost 5,000 times and has an average rating of 4.6 out of 5. Though if you want to get your hands on it, you’d better brush up on your Icelandic — that’s the only language it’s available in. The developers say they hope to release a version for iPhone users soon.

New App Helps Icelanders Avoid Accidental Incest

by Scott Malone
0
Transcript
Apr 18, 2013

New App Helps Icelanders Avoid Accidental Incest

(Image Source: Youtube/SadEngineerStudios


 

BY SCOTT MALONE

 


Asking someone you meet at a bar if they’re your cousin is probably not the best way to break the ice. But apparently it’s such an important piece of information in Iceland that there’s now an app for that.


The Islendinga App allows users to bump smartphones, and if you both share a grandparent it will set off an alarm and send you a text message as part of the — quote — “Incest Spoiler” feature. (Via WOLO)


Three University of Iceland students developed the app as part of a contest to make “new creative uses” of the Book of Icelanders — the country’s extensive genealogical database which traces the lineage of its current citizens back roughly 1,200 years.


A writer for Popular Science notes most of the country’s 320,000 people share a common descent from ninth century Viking settlers, and because of that “the danger probably lies more in kissing your second cousins.”


And apparently that occurs a little too often. Medical Daily quotes one of the app’s developers, saying:


“Everyone has heard the story of going to a family event and running into a girl you hooked up with some time ago. It’s not a good feeling when you realize that girl is a second cousin. People may think it’s funny, but [the app] is a necessity.”


Yes, he really called an app with an “Incest Spoiler” feature a necessity. But wouldn’t meeting someone with the same last name of one of your relatives be an immediate red flag? A writer for Wired explains the name game isn’t reliable in Iceland.


“Part of the problem ... is that Icelandic naming conventions don’t reflect someone’s descendants. ... Each new generation has a completely different name to the name of the generation that preceded it.”


So that means your cousins, aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews could all have different last names.


Businessweek points out the app has other convenient features, like a calendar to remind users of their relatives’ birthdays.


The Android app has been downloaded almost 5,000 times and has an average rating of 4.6 out of 5. Though if you want to get your hands on it, you’d better brush up on your Icelandic — that’s the only language it’s available in. The developers say they hope to release a version for iPhone users soon.

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