(Image Source: ESPN)

 

BY JONAH JAVAD

 

The NBA and the Players’ Union. It’s like the Cold War of collective bargaining. Now the NBA has offered a revised proposal to the Player’s Union, and league commissioner David Stern is steadfast regarding the latest offer.


The Washington Post quotes him, saying:

“There comes a time when you have to be through negotiating and we are. We have done everything possible that was possible to do. There is nothing left to negotiate about.”

 
Stern also said the league’s previous proposal was the last, best offer. Still, the Union appears unhappy with the revisions.

CBS Sports explains what might happen next.

“Reports flooded in Thursday night and Friday morning about upset agents and players, livid with the deal, saying nothing was granted of substance. If that proves to be the mood of the entire union, it's unlikely a vote will even see the light of day, much less an acceptance of the deal. That means decertification, that means lawsuits, and that means the loss of the entire 2011-2012 season.”

Looks like the player’s will get court time this season after all. In a courtroom that is. ESPN’s Ric Bucher elaborates why that could bad news bears for the league, players and fans.

“If we get to the point of going to court, that not only are we losing this season, but then because we’re starting the clock so late, it actually could impact the 2012-2013 season.”

There’s no doubt basketball fans are cheering for any deal to be made. But for a small market town with only one professional sports team, not just any deal will do.

A writer for Utah’s Deseret News shines some light on their plight.

“Several of the proposed scenarios may seem like fairly middle ground, but in this economy, that's not good enough for smaller market teams. A negative split in revenue, the lack of a hard salary cap or no revenue sharing could send the Jazz downstream.”

The league’s unhappy with the union. The union’s unhappy with the league. And fans are unhappy with both.

SB Nation hits the nail on the head

“It's not ideal but it is certainly not worth blowing up the season and perhaps ending up with a lesser deal in the end. It's time to suck it up, agree to the deal and play basketball.”

But until a deal gets done, the Mexican standoff continues.

NBA Proposes Revised Offer to Players Union

by
0
Transcript
Nov 12, 2011

NBA Proposes Revised Offer to Players Union

(Image Source: ESPN)

 

BY JONAH JAVAD

 

The NBA and the Players’ Union. It’s like the Cold War of collective bargaining. Now the NBA has offered a revised proposal to the Player’s Union, and league commissioner David Stern is steadfast regarding the latest offer.


The Washington Post quotes him, saying:

“There comes a time when you have to be through negotiating and we are. We have done everything possible that was possible to do. There is nothing left to negotiate about.”

 
Stern also said the league’s previous proposal was the last, best offer. Still, the Union appears unhappy with the revisions.

CBS Sports explains what might happen next.

“Reports flooded in Thursday night and Friday morning about upset agents and players, livid with the deal, saying nothing was granted of substance. If that proves to be the mood of the entire union, it's unlikely a vote will even see the light of day, much less an acceptance of the deal. That means decertification, that means lawsuits, and that means the loss of the entire 2011-2012 season.”

Looks like the player’s will get court time this season after all. In a courtroom that is. ESPN’s Ric Bucher elaborates why that could bad news bears for the league, players and fans.

“If we get to the point of going to court, that not only are we losing this season, but then because we’re starting the clock so late, it actually could impact the 2012-2013 season.”

There’s no doubt basketball fans are cheering for any deal to be made. But for a small market town with only one professional sports team, not just any deal will do.

A writer for Utah’s Deseret News shines some light on their plight.

“Several of the proposed scenarios may seem like fairly middle ground, but in this economy, that's not good enough for smaller market teams. A negative split in revenue, the lack of a hard salary cap or no revenue sharing could send the Jazz downstream.”

The league’s unhappy with the union. The union’s unhappy with the league. And fans are unhappy with both.

SB Nation hits the nail on the head

“It's not ideal but it is certainly not worth blowing up the season and perhaps ending up with a lesser deal in the end. It's time to suck it up, agree to the deal and play basketball.”

But until a deal gets done, the Mexican standoff continues.
View More
Comments
Newsy
www1