(Image source: The New York Times)

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

Egypt again braces for political uncertainty as human rights groups are now urging the government for a repeat of this weekend’s vote on the country’s controversial draft constitution -- alleging widespread voter fraud.

Preliminary results from the first round of voting show around 56 percent of voters said “yes” on the referendum -- giving President Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood the narrow edge they need to move forward with the constitution they crafted.

But the National Salvation Front, representing Egypt’s main opposition coalition, claims long lines, early closure of some voting centers, and reports of women being turned away from voting, justify a do-over.


CNN reports, Egypt’s electoral commission is investigating the complaints alleged by a coalition of 123 Egyptian rights groups.

The new constitution would make Sharia law the basis for legislation and limit the president to two terms but it fails to guarantee equal rights for women. Supporters say that will bring peace and stability to an already shaky region, others say it lacks the freedoms they fought for in the revolution.

According to one reporter at the English-language Egyptian newspaper, Ahram:
“[A] resilient yet pensive mood was palpable among many voters. This contrasts with Egypt’s previous post-revolution referendums and polls, during which most voters could be seen smiling and proudly showing off their ink-stained fingers to news cameras.”

The referendum comes after weeks of clashes in Cairo, which the opposition has argued provided reasoning to delay the vote. Taking the recent events into account, a political science professor in Cairo University explains to the Egypt Independent that:

“Despite the remobilization of all forces, the continuation of these parallel conflicts won’t necessarily protect the revolution or keep it alive. Most probably, it will exhaust all players, pushing them to take extreme action...”

The final result won’t be known until after the second round of voting — covering several other provinces — takes place Saturday.  

Morsi’s Party Claims Victory, Opposition Alleges Fraud

by Elizabeth Hagedorn
0
Transcript
Dec 16, 2012

Morsi’s Party Claims Victory, Opposition Alleges Fraud

 

(Image source: The New York Times)

 

BY ELIZABETH HAGEDORN

ANCHOR ZACH TOOMBS

 

Egypt again braces for political uncertainty as human rights groups are now urging the government for a repeat of this weekend’s vote on the country’s controversial draft constitution -- alleging widespread voter fraud.

Preliminary results from the first round of voting show around 56 percent of voters said “yes” on the referendum -- giving President Mohammed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood the narrow edge they need to move forward with the constitution they crafted.

But the National Salvation Front, representing Egypt’s main opposition coalition, claims long lines, early closure of some voting centers, and reports of women being turned away from voting, justify a do-over.


CNN reports, Egypt’s electoral commission is investigating the complaints alleged by a coalition of 123 Egyptian rights groups.

The new constitution would make Sharia law the basis for legislation and limit the president to two terms but it fails to guarantee equal rights for women. Supporters say that will bring peace and stability to an already shaky region, others say it lacks the freedoms they fought for in the revolution.

According to one reporter at the English-language Egyptian newspaper, Ahram:
“[A] resilient yet pensive mood was palpable among many voters. This contrasts with Egypt’s previous post-revolution referendums and polls, during which most voters could be seen smiling and proudly showing off their ink-stained fingers to news cameras.”

The referendum comes after weeks of clashes in Cairo, which the opposition has argued provided reasoning to delay the vote. Taking the recent events into account, a political science professor in Cairo University explains to the Egypt Independent that:

“Despite the remobilization of all forces, the continuation of these parallel conflicts won’t necessarily protect the revolution or keep it alive. Most probably, it will exhaust all players, pushing them to take extreme action...”

The final result won’t be known until after the second round of voting — covering several other provinces — takes place Saturday.  

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