(Image Source: The Washington Times' Emad Matti)  



BY VICTORIA CRAIG



At least 46 people are dead, more than 200 injured in eight cities across Iraq. This after a series of shootings and car bombings in the nation. Fox News explains a possible motive behind the sudden increased violence.

“Iraqi police and government officials appear to be the main targets of these attacks. These attacks today may have been an effort to upstage the annual meeting of the Arab League that is set for next week.”

The attacks also come on the anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. The BBC reports, since then, lawlessness has continued – and whomever carried out the attack wants to prove security isn’t guaranteed.

“Iraq is looking forward to hosting of this Arab League summit - the first time in more than 20 years that they’ve hosted an Arab League event like this. And they obviously hoped that security would be at its tightest and under control.”

Still, the BBC reports, violence is down from its height in 2006 and 2007. Al Jazeera explains what Iraqis might have to do to keep security tight ahead of the Arab Summit in Baghdad next week.

“Security forces in Iraq have been placed on high alert ahead of the Arab League summit. Officials insist Iraq's forces are capable of maintaining security for the summit, but have admitted they may need to effectively shut down Baghdad to do so.”

The Washington Post reports, when American troops left Iraq last year, they left improved security forces in place. But, those forces still lack intelligence-gathering abilities and forensic training necessary to investigate and prevent attacks like these. Further, it reports these attacks delivered a blow to Iraqi officials who hoped the Arab League Summit would go on without incident.

“Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and his officials have gone to great lengths to encourage Arab leaders to attend the meeting, seeing it as symbolic of Iraq’s return to sovereignty and normalcy in the wake of the American withdrawal.But terror groups are likely to increase their efforts as the meeting approaches.”

Even so, CBC News reports this latest round of deadly violence in Iraq could be just the tip of the iceberg and officials have been bracing for these attacks.

“Insurgents are seeking to belie Baghdad's better image, and officials expect more attacks as hundreds of dignitaries and journalists converge on the capital next week. Two of the attacks Tuesday hit right outside the Green Zone where the summit will be held...An estimated 26,000 police and soldiers — including more than 4,000 from Iraq's north and south — are expected to be deployed in Baghdad.”

Though officials aren’t sure who carried out the attacks in Iraq, the Washington Post reports some American agencies say the attacks have the markings of Al Quada. At this point, no person, group, or organization has claimed responsibility.

More Than 200 Injured in Deadly Attacks in Iraq

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Mar 20, 2012

More Than 200 Injured in Deadly Attacks in Iraq

(Image Source: The Washington Times' Emad Matti)  



BY VICTORIA CRAIG



At least 46 people are dead, more than 200 injured in eight cities across Iraq. This after a series of shootings and car bombings in the nation. Fox News explains a possible motive behind the sudden increased violence.

“Iraqi police and government officials appear to be the main targets of these attacks. These attacks today may have been an effort to upstage the annual meeting of the Arab League that is set for next week.”

The attacks also come on the anniversary of the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. The BBC reports, since then, lawlessness has continued – and whomever carried out the attack wants to prove security isn’t guaranteed.

“Iraq is looking forward to hosting of this Arab League summit - the first time in more than 20 years that they’ve hosted an Arab League event like this. And they obviously hoped that security would be at its tightest and under control.”

Still, the BBC reports, violence is down from its height in 2006 and 2007. Al Jazeera explains what Iraqis might have to do to keep security tight ahead of the Arab Summit in Baghdad next week.

“Security forces in Iraq have been placed on high alert ahead of the Arab League summit. Officials insist Iraq's forces are capable of maintaining security for the summit, but have admitted they may need to effectively shut down Baghdad to do so.”

The Washington Post reports, when American troops left Iraq last year, they left improved security forces in place. But, those forces still lack intelligence-gathering abilities and forensic training necessary to investigate and prevent attacks like these. Further, it reports these attacks delivered a blow to Iraqi officials who hoped the Arab League Summit would go on without incident.

“Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and his officials have gone to great lengths to encourage Arab leaders to attend the meeting, seeing it as symbolic of Iraq’s return to sovereignty and normalcy in the wake of the American withdrawal.But terror groups are likely to increase their efforts as the meeting approaches.”

Even so, CBC News reports this latest round of deadly violence in Iraq could be just the tip of the iceberg and officials have been bracing for these attacks.

“Insurgents are seeking to belie Baghdad's better image, and officials expect more attacks as hundreds of dignitaries and journalists converge on the capital next week. Two of the attacks Tuesday hit right outside the Green Zone where the summit will be held...An estimated 26,000 police and soldiers — including more than 4,000 from Iraq's north and south — are expected to be deployed in Baghdad.”

Though officials aren’t sure who carried out the attacks in Iraq, the Washington Post reports some American agencies say the attacks have the markings of Al Quada. At this point, no person, group, or organization has claimed responsibility.

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