(Image source: Sports Illustrated)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR KATIE BRENNAN

Kate Upton graced the cover of Sports Illustrated for the second year in a row, the first time the magazine has had the same model on the cover for back-to-back years since Tyra Banks in 1996 and ‘97.

 

Upton wasn’t exactly dressed for the weather in the first-ever fashion shoot on Antarctica. But with at least 16 other options, why her? Swimsuit Issue editor MJ Day explains he needed someone he could count on, especially with the sub-zero wind chill.

 

"I knew that if I needed to bury someone in clothing, I needed her physique and curves to come through. So to bring her was obvious: I knew I could put a one-piece on her and she wouldn't look flat, she'd still look voluptuous and healthy and shapely and sexy." 

 

But it’s these curves that have created some negative feedback for Upton...

 

“Last year a blogger known as Skinny Girl created a stir online when she called Upton thick, and further wrote she had huge thighs, no waist, big fat floppy boobs, terrible definition. She looks like a squishy brick.”

 

The decision to put Kate on the cover may have received some heat from those who want the usual skinnier models, but that criticism hasn’t stopped her from flaunting it all.

 

“This is a fairly controversial choice in some circles as Kate is very far removed from the typical, skeletal model that adorns magazine covers to begin with. What's cool about Kate is that she doesn't seem to care what the conventions are.”

 

The controversy doesn’t only surround the choice regarding the model, as some people claim. Instead, a pop-culture writer for PolicyMic argues there’s a bigger problem in the decision to have a Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue at all. 

 

“There is no question that the magazine is a marketing extravaganza that exploits the objectification of women. It is misogynistic to its core. But let’s face it, that is also an American tradition. The swimsuit issue sells because American sports fans like women in skimpy outfits. It is sexy, and sex sells. So does sports, so obviously putting them together creates a dynamic package.”

 

But some are excited she’s made the cover again. A writer for Rant Sports points out it’s disappointing when football season comes to an end, but by February sports fans have something to look forward to.

 

“When you look at this year's cover, she’s wearing a very sexy polar bear type outfit. It’s expected to hit stands this week. And I’m pretty sure male fans will not be disappointed.”

 

PolicyMic reports the swimsuit edition normally sells more than 1 million copies. 

 

Model Kate Upton Back on SI Swimsuit Issue Cover

by Nichole Cartmell
1
Transcript
Feb 12, 2013

Model Kate Upton Back on SI Swimsuit Issue Cover

 

(Image source: Sports Illustrated)

BY NICHOLE CARTMELL

ANCHOR KATIE BRENNAN

Kate Upton graced the cover of Sports Illustrated for the second year in a row, the first time the magazine has had the same model on the cover for back-to-back years since Tyra Banks in 1996 and ‘97.

 

Upton wasn’t exactly dressed for the weather in the first-ever fashion shoot on Antarctica. But with at least 16 other options, why her? Swimsuit Issue editor MJ Day explains he needed someone he could count on, especially with the sub-zero wind chill.

 

"I knew that if I needed to bury someone in clothing, I needed her physique and curves to come through. So to bring her was obvious: I knew I could put a one-piece on her and she wouldn't look flat, she'd still look voluptuous and healthy and shapely and sexy." 

 

But it’s these curves that have created some negative feedback for Upton...

 

“Last year a blogger known as Skinny Girl created a stir online when she called Upton thick, and further wrote she had huge thighs, no waist, big fat floppy boobs, terrible definition. She looks like a squishy brick.”

 

The decision to put Kate on the cover may have received some heat from those who want the usual skinnier models, but that criticism hasn’t stopped her from flaunting it all.

 

“This is a fairly controversial choice in some circles as Kate is very far removed from the typical, skeletal model that adorns magazine covers to begin with. What's cool about Kate is that she doesn't seem to care what the conventions are.”

 

The controversy doesn’t only surround the choice regarding the model, as some people claim. Instead, a pop-culture writer for PolicyMic argues there’s a bigger problem in the decision to have a Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue at all. 

 

“There is no question that the magazine is a marketing extravaganza that exploits the objectification of women. It is misogynistic to its core. But let’s face it, that is also an American tradition. The swimsuit issue sells because American sports fans like women in skimpy outfits. It is sexy, and sex sells. So does sports, so obviously putting them together creates a dynamic package.”

 

But some are excited she’s made the cover again. A writer for Rant Sports points out it’s disappointing when football season comes to an end, but by February sports fans have something to look forward to.

 

“When you look at this year's cover, she’s wearing a very sexy polar bear type outfit. It’s expected to hit stands this week. And I’m pretty sure male fans will not be disappointed.”

 

PolicyMic reports the swimsuit edition normally sells more than 1 million copies. 

 

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