(Image Source: CBSSports)

 

BY ANDREW CARTER

 

He said, he said. Dino Laurenzi, the MLB collector who allegedly mishandled Ryan Braun’s urine sample, released a statement late Tuesday. The Sports Network has it.

 

“I followed the same procedure in collecting Mr. Braun’s sample as I did in the hundreds of other samples I collected under the Program. … At no point did I tamper in any way with the samples.”

 

Laurenzi has been under scrutiny for waiting two days to ship the sample. In his statement, he explained there were no shipping facilities within 50 miles from where he collected it. An analyst on ESPN says, Laurenzi did himself a favor.

 

"Well I thought he presented himself very well and came across credibly in that statement ... it still appears this could have been mishandled but I think this fellow came across in a pretty good way today, at least with that statement."

 

Braun has publicly criticized Laurenzi for not following MLB protocol. According to Laurenzi— the sample stayed sealed in his basement office that was “sufficiently cool” until he could ship it. But the  “Sufficiently cool” sounds ambiguous to the blog Disciples Of Uecker

 

“Laurenzi says he stored the samples in a Rubbermaid container in his office ... Who made the ruling that the room was “sufficiently cool” … At what temperature was the office kept?”

 

But Big League Stew says Laurenzi did the best he could under the given circumstances.

 

“Assuming he is telling the truth, and there's no reason not to, that means Laurenzi has gotten a lot of grief for doing his job the best anyone could.”

 

And now that the tester has made his public statement, how does Braun look when the dust clears? A writer for USA Today says there was no doubt Braun was trying to attack Laurenzi.

 

“Ryan Braun didn't shoot the messenger. But he took dead aim on the guy who couldn't get to the messenger.”

 

The newspaper held a poll, and the fallout doesn’t look good for the young slugger. 72% of the readers felt that Braun’s public attack on the tester was “Cheap and Classless.”

 

In his column, Washington Post writer Matt Brooks says Braun made much ado about having his reputation dragged through the mud, but seemed all too content to drag Laurenzi through it with him.

 

“...the same can now be said for Laurenzi whose reputation has now been tarnished whether he improperly handled Braun’s drug test sample or not.”

 

In the end the MLB arbitrator ruled the delay in shipping was enough for Braun to win his appeal. Whether he was vindicated, or got away with one, Yahoo!Sports says the MVP needs to stop picking fights and just remain thankful.

 

“What Braun doesn’t seem to realize is that the flaws he criticized were precisely what saved him from his appeal being about the substance in his urine rather than the journey his urine took. … The system that Ryan Braun believed failed baseball not only gave him a touchdown, it was letting him dance in the end zone.”

 

So he said...he said... and now they said. 

MLB Urine Sample Collector Leaks a Statement

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Feb 29, 2012

MLB Urine Sample Collector Leaks a Statement

(Image Source: CBSSports)

 

BY ANDREW CARTER

 

He said, he said. Dino Laurenzi, the MLB collector who allegedly mishandled Ryan Braun’s urine sample, released a statement late Tuesday. The Sports Network has it.

 

“I followed the same procedure in collecting Mr. Braun’s sample as I did in the hundreds of other samples I collected under the Program. … At no point did I tamper in any way with the samples.”

 

Laurenzi has been under scrutiny for waiting two days to ship the sample. In his statement, he explained there were no shipping facilities within 50 miles from where he collected it. An analyst on ESPN says, Laurenzi did himself a favor.

 

"Well I thought he presented himself very well and came across credibly in that statement ... it still appears this could have been mishandled but I think this fellow came across in a pretty good way today, at least with that statement."

 

Braun has publicly criticized Laurenzi for not following MLB protocol. According to Laurenzi— the sample stayed sealed in his basement office that was “sufficiently cool” until he could ship it. But the  “Sufficiently cool” sounds ambiguous to the blog Disciples Of Uecker

 

“Laurenzi says he stored the samples in a Rubbermaid container in his office ... Who made the ruling that the room was “sufficiently cool” … At what temperature was the office kept?”

 

But Big League Stew says Laurenzi did the best he could under the given circumstances.

 

“Assuming he is telling the truth, and there's no reason not to, that means Laurenzi has gotten a lot of grief for doing his job the best anyone could.”

 

And now that the tester has made his public statement, how does Braun look when the dust clears? A writer for USA Today says there was no doubt Braun was trying to attack Laurenzi.

 

“Ryan Braun didn't shoot the messenger. But he took dead aim on the guy who couldn't get to the messenger.”

 

The newspaper held a poll, and the fallout doesn’t look good for the young slugger. 72% of the readers felt that Braun’s public attack on the tester was “Cheap and Classless.”

 

In his column, Washington Post writer Matt Brooks says Braun made much ado about having his reputation dragged through the mud, but seemed all too content to drag Laurenzi through it with him.

 

“...the same can now be said for Laurenzi whose reputation has now been tarnished whether he improperly handled Braun’s drug test sample or not.”

 

In the end the MLB arbitrator ruled the delay in shipping was enough for Braun to win his appeal. Whether he was vindicated, or got away with one, Yahoo!Sports says the MVP needs to stop picking fights and just remain thankful.

 

“What Braun doesn’t seem to realize is that the flaws he criticized were precisely what saved him from his appeal being about the substance in his urine rather than the journey his urine took. … The system that Ryan Braun believed failed baseball not only gave him a touchdown, it was letting him dance in the end zone.”

 

So he said...he said... and now they said. 

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