(Image source:  University of Pittsburgh Medical Center)


BY JASMINE BAILEY


A woman who has been paralyzed from the neck down for nine years, can now pick up objects, feed herself and even shake hands — all with a robotic arm she controls with her mind.


The BBC reports — 53-year-old Jan Scheuermann was diagnosed with a degenerative genetic disease 13 years ago and can no longer move her arms or legs.


Doctors implanted two sensors in the motor cortex of her brain. Those sensors pick up electrical activity from about 200 individual brain cells.


And in turn make the arm move — researchers at the University of Pittsburgh developed the technology. Unlike past technology, instead of having to think where to move the arm, a patient can simply focus on the goal, such as "pick up the ball".


Developers are calling this technology the most sophisticated ever.Sky News has an interview with Scheuermann, who says after the strenuous 13-week training period, she has finally accomplished her goal.


“They were asking if there was something special I wanted to do… My goal is to feed myself chocolate and I did that today.”


Developers noted in the Lancet Journal that with continued development, brain—machine interfaces could provide a solution to restoring many of the functions lost in paralysis.

 

 

 

 

 

Mind Control, Robotic Arm 'Unprecedented'

by Jasmine Bailey
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Transcript
Dec 17, 2012

Mind Control, Robotic Arm 'Unprecedented'

 

(Image source:  University of Pittsburgh Medical Center)


BY JASMINE BAILEY


A woman who has been paralyzed from the neck down for nine years, can now pick up objects, feed herself and even shake hands — all with a robotic arm she controls with her mind.


The BBC reports — 53-year-old Jan Scheuermann was diagnosed with a degenerative genetic disease 13 years ago and can no longer move her arms or legs.


Doctors implanted two sensors in the motor cortex of her brain. Those sensors pick up electrical activity from about 200 individual brain cells.


And in turn make the arm move — researchers at the University of Pittsburgh developed the technology. Unlike past technology, instead of having to think where to move the arm, a patient can simply focus on the goal, such as "pick up the ball".


Developers are calling this technology the most sophisticated ever.Sky News has an interview with Scheuermann, who says after the strenuous 13-week training period, she has finally accomplished her goal.


“They were asking if there was something special I wanted to do… My goal is to feed myself chocolate and I did that today.”


Developers noted in the Lancet Journal that with continued development, brain—machine interfaces could provide a solution to restoring many of the functions lost in paralysis.

 

 

 

 

 

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