(Image Source: Bloomberg)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Microsoft and Google’s Motorola Mobility are squaring off in a new patent lawsuit that will help establish how royalty rates are calculated for the use of industry standard technology. Seattle’s KIRO explains …  

“Microsoft and Google will battle in a Seattle courtroom … A federal judge will rule how much money Microsoft will have to pay Google to use technology protected by Google's patents.” 

Business Insider notes “Microsoft claims Motorola tried to charge it an unfair price for video streaming patents, while Motorola says it charges other companies a similar price. The case could be a game changer because Motorola and Microsoft are trying to gain ground in the smartphone industry and have a lot of patents … ” 

PC World explains Motorola wants to charge Microsoft 2.25 percent of the price for each product that implements the industry standard …

“ … including its Xbox 360 game console and Windows OS … [Microsoft] cites several arguments, including one based on a ‘stacking’ theory, which says that if every company contributing patents charged as much as Motorola, the standard would be too expensive to use.”  

An analyst for Bloomberg says the lawsuit will have a major effect on the current technology patent war and these two companies’ current business models. He says Google hopes for broad, sweeping cross-licensing from the lawsuit while Microsoft …

“ … well they have spent years enabling a product ecosystem and what they are trying to do now is generate revenue from their significant patent arsenal. More infringement is actually better from them.”  

But the BBC notes Google has sought to take action against Microsoft as well, filing lawsuits in the U.S. and Europe attempting to block the sales of several Microsoft products based on patent infringement.

“In May, Google succeed in winning an injunction against Microsoft in Germany, allowing it to impose a sales ban there against the Xbox 360 games console, Windows 7 system software, Internet Explorer browser and Windows Media Player.” 

However, The Seattle Times notes U.S. Judge James Robart barred Google from enforcing that injunction pending the results of the Seattle trial. “Judge Robart is expected in this bench trial to issue an opinion on what is reasonable.” 

Microsoft, Google Square Off Over Patent Royalty Rates

by John O'Connor
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Transcript
Nov 14, 2012

Microsoft, Google Square Off Over Patent Royalty Rates

 

(Image Source: Bloomberg)

BY JOHN O’CONNOR

ANCHOR JASMINE BAILEY

Microsoft and Google’s Motorola Mobility are squaring off in a new patent lawsuit that will help establish how royalty rates are calculated for the use of industry standard technology. Seattle’s KIRO explains …  

“Microsoft and Google will battle in a Seattle courtroom … A federal judge will rule how much money Microsoft will have to pay Google to use technology protected by Google's patents.” 

Business Insider notes “Microsoft claims Motorola tried to charge it an unfair price for video streaming patents, while Motorola says it charges other companies a similar price. The case could be a game changer because Motorola and Microsoft are trying to gain ground in the smartphone industry and have a lot of patents … ” 

PC World explains Motorola wants to charge Microsoft 2.25 percent of the price for each product that implements the industry standard …

“ … including its Xbox 360 game console and Windows OS … [Microsoft] cites several arguments, including one based on a ‘stacking’ theory, which says that if every company contributing patents charged as much as Motorola, the standard would be too expensive to use.”  

An analyst for Bloomberg says the lawsuit will have a major effect on the current technology patent war and these two companies’ current business models. He says Google hopes for broad, sweeping cross-licensing from the lawsuit while Microsoft …

“ … well they have spent years enabling a product ecosystem and what they are trying to do now is generate revenue from their significant patent arsenal. More infringement is actually better from them.”  

But the BBC notes Google has sought to take action against Microsoft as well, filing lawsuits in the U.S. and Europe attempting to block the sales of several Microsoft products based on patent infringement.

“In May, Google succeed in winning an injunction against Microsoft in Germany, allowing it to impose a sales ban there against the Xbox 360 games console, Windows 7 system software, Internet Explorer browser and Windows Media Player.” 

However, The Seattle Times notes U.S. Judge James Robart barred Google from enforcing that injunction pending the results of the Seattle trial. “Judge Robart is expected in this bench trial to issue an opinion on what is reasonable.” 

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