(Image Source: MichaelJackson.com)


BY LAUREN ZIMA

The late Michael Jackson’s songs — his most valuable property — stolen. KXTV reports.

“Hackers downloaded the entire back catalogue of Michael Jackson songs. Some 50,000 of them. Many have never been released. It reportedly happened a year ago — soon after Sony purchased the music from Jackson’s estate.”

KSDK has the background — with some insight into the stolen music’s value.

“The record company paid $250 million to Jackson’s estate in 2010 for that catalogue, including unheard material from studio sessions when the superstar recorded ‘Off the Wall,’ ‘Thriller’ and ‘Bad.’”

The theft reportedly took place around the same time hackers attacked Sony’s PlayStation Network, stealing the data of 77 million users, though news of the hack has just now come to light.

The Sunday Times was first to break the story, but Sony has confirmed to the BBC the hack happened.

Billboard says stolen songs include never-before-heard duets with The Black Eyed Peas’ Will.i.am, and late Queen singer Freddie Mercury.

The latest is that someone has been arrested for the hack — two people, actually. The Guardian reports:

“On Friday, two men who were arrested last May appeared in court in the UK accused of offences in connection with the alleged security breach. James Marks, 26 ... and James McCormick, 25 … denied charges under the Computer Misuse Act and the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act…”

The Guardian reports the men were released on bail, and aren’t due to stand trial until next January. So — what does the hack mean for Sony, and the songs? Many in the media say it could be bad — CNET reports:

“…protecting unreleased songs from unauthorized debuts has become a special challenge in recent years.”

So is Sony’s multi-million dollar purchase a wash? TIME says — not entirely, because the deal also covered use of Jackson’s music in video games, TV ads and future projects.

“... is all that money down the drain now? Probably not. … There’s still plenty of money to be made, even if Jackson’s entire catalog of unreleased tracks appears on BitTorrent sites, which, from what I can tell hasn’t happened yet.”

And PC Mag reminds us how hacks were a huge problem for Sony in 2011 — including congressional hearings to see if users’ credit card info had been stolen.

“Sony … had a rough 2011 as it related to hackers. … a huge PR nightmare … Recently, Sony said Kazuo Hirai would replace Howard Stringer as its new CEO. During last week's Mobile World Congress, Hirai took the stage during a press briefing and pledged to ‘rebuild’ Sony.”


 

Michael Jackson Song Catalogue Stolen

by Lauren Zima
0
Transcript
Mar 5, 2012

Michael Jackson Song Catalogue Stolen

(Image Source: MichaelJackson.com)


BY LAUREN ZIMA

The late Michael Jackson’s songs — his most valuable property — stolen. KXTV reports.

“Hackers downloaded the entire back catalogue of Michael Jackson songs. Some 50,000 of them. Many have never been released. It reportedly happened a year ago — soon after Sony purchased the music from Jackson’s estate.”

KSDK has the background — with some insight into the stolen music’s value.

“The record company paid $250 million to Jackson’s estate in 2010 for that catalogue, including unheard material from studio sessions when the superstar recorded ‘Off the Wall,’ ‘Thriller’ and ‘Bad.’”

The theft reportedly took place around the same time hackers attacked Sony’s PlayStation Network, stealing the data of 77 million users, though news of the hack has just now come to light.

The Sunday Times was first to break the story, but Sony has confirmed to the BBC the hack happened.

Billboard says stolen songs include never-before-heard duets with The Black Eyed Peas’ Will.i.am, and late Queen singer Freddie Mercury.

The latest is that someone has been arrested for the hack — two people, actually. The Guardian reports:

“On Friday, two men who were arrested last May appeared in court in the UK accused of offences in connection with the alleged security breach. James Marks, 26 ... and James McCormick, 25 … denied charges under the Computer Misuse Act and the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act…”

The Guardian reports the men were released on bail, and aren’t due to stand trial until next January. So — what does the hack mean for Sony, and the songs? Many in the media say it could be bad — CNET reports:

“…protecting unreleased songs from unauthorized debuts has become a special challenge in recent years.”

So is Sony’s multi-million dollar purchase a wash? TIME says — not entirely, because the deal also covered use of Jackson’s music in video games, TV ads and future projects.

“... is all that money down the drain now? Probably not. … There’s still plenty of money to be made, even if Jackson’s entire catalog of unreleased tracks appears on BitTorrent sites, which, from what I can tell hasn’t happened yet.”

And PC Mag reminds us how hacks were a huge problem for Sony in 2011 — including congressional hearings to see if users’ credit card info had been stolen.

“Sony … had a rough 2011 as it related to hackers. … a huge PR nightmare … Recently, Sony said Kazuo Hirai would replace Howard Stringer as its new CEO. During last week's Mobile World Congress, Hirai took the stage during a press briefing and pledged to ‘rebuild’ Sony.”


 

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