(Image source: International Business Times)

 

BY VERONICA POLIVANAYA

ANCHOR JIM FLINK

You're watching multisource U.S. video news analysis from Newsy.


Those feeling the burn after a long night of partying will soon be able to hop aboard Hangover Heaven.  It’s an after-party bus in Las Vegas that promises to cure your hangover. KPIX explains.

“You get on, they give you an IV that is supposed to get rid of all the poisons in your body that cause hangovers. Takes about 45 minutes and costs 90 bucks.”

The idea is the brainchild of Jason Burke, a anesthesiologist and self-proclaimed hangover specialist. Services start at 90 dollars and can include anti-nausea medication and vitamin supplements. But an anchor with KNXV isn’t on board with the idea.

“Who wants to be stuck on a bus when you’re hungover? That’s the last place I want to be…the only thing that would make this better have cute nurses going around doing the stuff for them.”

Each bus is equipped with a GPS tracking device. By logging on to the bus website, you can pinpoint its location and pick-up destinations. But if you want to spare yourself the trouble, you can upgrade to the in-room treatment. For $500, a doctor will come to your hotel room and fill you up with everything the bus has to offer. But a writer for the Daily Mail doesn’t think the remedy is worth the price tag.

“Some might say that paying such an astonishing amount to feel better might be enough to make you feel sick all over again – although, presumably, if you have already bet the mortgage on red in a gambling frenzy, another couple of hundred pounds is unlikely to make much difference to your Vegas experience.”

The website says there’s no catch—it’s all FDA approved. But a writer for Gizmodo says—no thanks.

JESUS DIAZ: “I don't care about FDA approval or not. I would rather not have anyone injecting anything in my circulatory system through an IV line… I'd man up, pop an Ibuprofen and drink Gatorade, thank you very much.”

But a doctor says FDA approval doesn’t guarantee safety. Fox News quotes him.

DR. ARTHUR CAPLAN: “You really gotta specialize this, if you will, for the person, in terms of how much did they drink, how big is their body size, on and on it goes. I wouldn’t want to be writing the insurance for this guy.”

And according to Britain’s National Health Service, the service is too good to be true.

“Hangover cures are generally a myth. There are no cures for a hangover. There are tips for avoiding hangovers and for easing the symptoms if you have one. The best way to avoid a hangover is not to drink.”

Hangover Heaven will launch in Vegas April 14. But the website creators emphasize the importance of drinking in moderation. A disclaimer reads “Alcohol overdose can kill you and Hangover Heaven cannot reverse death. Our busses can work magic, but they cannot bring you back from the dead.”

 

Meet the 'Hangover Heaven' After-Party Bus

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Apr 11, 2012

Meet the 'Hangover Heaven' After-Party Bus

(Image source: International Business Times)

 

BY VERONICA POLIVANAYA

ANCHOR JIM FLINK

You're watching multisource U.S. video news analysis from Newsy.


Those feeling the burn after a long night of partying will soon be able to hop aboard Hangover Heaven.  It’s an after-party bus in Las Vegas that promises to cure your hangover. KPIX explains.

“You get on, they give you an IV that is supposed to get rid of all the poisons in your body that cause hangovers. Takes about 45 minutes and costs 90 bucks.”

The idea is the brainchild of Jason Burke, a anesthesiologist and self-proclaimed hangover specialist. Services start at 90 dollars and can include anti-nausea medication and vitamin supplements. But an anchor with KNXV isn’t on board with the idea.

“Who wants to be stuck on a bus when you’re hungover? That’s the last place I want to be…the only thing that would make this better have cute nurses going around doing the stuff for them.”

Each bus is equipped with a GPS tracking device. By logging on to the bus website, you can pinpoint its location and pick-up destinations. But if you want to spare yourself the trouble, you can upgrade to the in-room treatment. For $500, a doctor will come to your hotel room and fill you up with everything the bus has to offer. But a writer for the Daily Mail doesn’t think the remedy is worth the price tag.

“Some might say that paying such an astonishing amount to feel better might be enough to make you feel sick all over again – although, presumably, if you have already bet the mortgage on red in a gambling frenzy, another couple of hundred pounds is unlikely to make much difference to your Vegas experience.”

The website says there’s no catch—it’s all FDA approved. But a writer for Gizmodo says—no thanks.

JESUS DIAZ: “I don't care about FDA approval or not. I would rather not have anyone injecting anything in my circulatory system through an IV line… I'd man up, pop an Ibuprofen and drink Gatorade, thank you very much.”

But a doctor says FDA approval doesn’t guarantee safety. Fox News quotes him.

DR. ARTHUR CAPLAN: “You really gotta specialize this, if you will, for the person, in terms of how much did they drink, how big is their body size, on and on it goes. I wouldn’t want to be writing the insurance for this guy.”

And according to Britain’s National Health Service, the service is too good to be true.

“Hangover cures are generally a myth. There are no cures for a hangover. There are tips for avoiding hangovers and for easing the symptoms if you have one. The best way to avoid a hangover is not to drink.”

Hangover Heaven will launch in Vegas April 14. But the website creators emphasize the importance of drinking in moderation. A disclaimer reads “Alcohol overdose can kill you and Hangover Heaven cannot reverse death. Our busses can work magic, but they cannot bring you back from the dead.”

 

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