Image Source: NASA

BY: NICHOLE CARTMELL
ANCHOR:


Mars’ curiosity rover strikes gold... or better yet... signs of water.

NASA reports the rover is driving toward a flat rock with pale veins that might hold clues to a wet history on Mars. If Curiosity’s handlers approve, this rock will be the first to be drilled for a sample. The Mars Science Laboratory project manager says...

"Drilling into a rock to collect a sample will be this mission's most challenging activity since the landing. It has never been done on Mars.”

The Christian Science Monitor explains the details of the rock are still fuzzy.
But the composition of the minerals indicate they precipitated out of water flowing through fissures in the rock. And large grains within the rocks are rounded, suggesting water might have dulled their sharp edges. This is exciting for many reasons.

“Like sedimentary rocks, minerals are made of bits and pieces from somewhere else... And different minerals precipitate out at different temperatures, yielding some information about the environment at the time the minerals formed.”

This latest mission comes nearly six months since Curiosity first landed on the Red Planet. Science Recorder reports if it finds water, or evidence of water, NASA would be one step closer to accomplishing its mission.

“Whether the latest findings eventually lead to clear evidence of liquid water remains to be seen … discovering signs of water would greatly increase the odds that life once roamed Mars.”

The Christian Science Monitor reports drilling should begin within the next two weeks.

(SOC)
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Mars Curiosity Rover Strikes Gold

by Nichole Cartmell
0
Transcript
Jan 20, 2013

Mars Curiosity Rover Strikes Gold

 

Image Source: NASA

BY: NICHOLE CARTMELL
ANCHOR:


Mars’ curiosity rover strikes gold... or better yet... signs of water.

NASA reports the rover is driving toward a flat rock with pale veins that might hold clues to a wet history on Mars. If Curiosity’s handlers approve, this rock will be the first to be drilled for a sample. The Mars Science Laboratory project manager says...

"Drilling into a rock to collect a sample will be this mission's most challenging activity since the landing. It has never been done on Mars.”

The Christian Science Monitor explains the details of the rock are still fuzzy.
But the composition of the minerals indicate they precipitated out of water flowing through fissures in the rock. And large grains within the rocks are rounded, suggesting water might have dulled their sharp edges. This is exciting for many reasons.

“Like sedimentary rocks, minerals are made of bits and pieces from somewhere else... And different minerals precipitate out at different temperatures, yielding some information about the environment at the time the minerals formed.”

This latest mission comes nearly six months since Curiosity first landed on the Red Planet. Science Recorder reports if it finds water, or evidence of water, NASA would be one step closer to accomplishing its mission.

“Whether the latest findings eventually lead to clear evidence of liquid water remains to be seen … discovering signs of water would greatly increase the odds that life once roamed Mars.”

The Christian Science Monitor reports drilling should begin within the next two weeks.

(SOC)
###

 

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